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Dreams of Being Eaten Alive: The Literary Core of the Kabbalah ebook

by David Rosenberg


A literary analysis of the origins of Kabbalah reveals the complex web of storytelling, tradition, and mysticism . The fact that I seldom give up on a book only made it worse. I respect some of the approaches, but the ideas are built on nonsense.

A literary analysis of the origins of Kabbalah reveals the complex web of storytelling, tradition, and mysticism contained in this revered sacred practice. 10,000 first printing. May 17, 2014 Sue Lipton rated it it was ok. Shelves: stuck-partway, gave-up. Like Antoinette, I really want to read and understand-about kabbalah. Maybe this wasn't the "right" intro.

David Rosenberg book is the first I read which does not explain Kabbalah. Like love, Kabbalah canot be explained

David Rosenberg book is the first I read which does not explain Kabbalah. Like love, Kabbalah canot be explained.

David Rosenberg book is the first I read which does not explain Kabbalah Rosenberg does a wonderful job of explaining why the Kabbalah is, not what it is. This is a book of mystical truths and archetypes. His interpretations are insightful and provocative. Rosenberg does a wonderful job of explaining why the Kabbalah is, not what it is.

Dreams of Being Eaten Alive: The Literary Core of the Kabbalah (2000), Harmony Books (New York, NY. Using the books of Samuel as his main source, Rosenberg shows King David as king, warrior, poet, and scholar.

Dreams of Being Eaten Alive: The Literary Core of the Kabbalah (2000), Harmony Books (New York, NY). See What You Think: Critical Essays for the Next Avant Garde (2003), Spuyten Duyvil (New York, NY. The narrator is "S", who was possibly a young man in a sexual relationship with J, from The Book of J. Jeff Ahrens of Booklist said: "He translates the results, which actually lack the events of David's life before he became king, and they entertain as much as the presentation of them fascinates.

Tell us if something is incorrect. Weaving the mysteries of identity, storytelling, and life after death, this collection of complex stories provides a spellbinding journey from the modern world to the Kabbalah, finding new meaning in both. Dreams of Being Eaten Alive : The Literary Core of the Kabbalah.

He is best known for The Book of J (with Harold Bloom) and A Poet's Bible, which earned PEN Translation Prize in 1992. The Book of J stayed on The New York Times bestseller list. Dreams of Being Eaten Alive: The Literary Core of the Kabbalah (2000), Harmony Books (New York, NY). See What You Think: Critical Essays for the Next Avant Garde (2003), Spuyten Duyvil (New York, NY). Abraham: The First Historical Biography (2006), Basic Books (New York, NY).

The Literary Core of the Kabbalah. There's no description for this book yet.

Dreams of Being Eaten Alive. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Dreams of Being Eaten Alive from your list? Dreams of Being Eaten Alive. The Literary Core of the Kabbalah. Published September 4, 2001 by Three Rivers Press. In library, History and criticism, Cabala.

Dreams of Being Eaten Alive The Literary Core of the Kabbalah By DAVID ROSENBERG Harmony. I found that the dreams were scarier than I thought they would be, and although there was plenty of sex, I could not tell what was happening, as in my sonnets. At this point, I began to read Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, the novel by James Joyce, in my tenth-grade English class, and the revelations began. Even though this seemed to be a bright ending, the key to the poem for me was that it set the model that dreams were about dying and the fear of being lost or eaten (either fate associated with sheep). But where was the sex?

David Rosenberg, long considered the leading poet-translator of the Bible, now unveils the literary basis for the Kabbalah . Like the great stories of the twentieth century, Dreams of Being Eaten Alive enriches our literature by stretching our consciousness.

David Rosenberg, long considered the leading poet-translator of the Bible, now unveils the literary basis for the Kabbalah as the major counter-tradition in Western history. The Kabbalah becomes news once again, as Rosenberg peels back its philosophical grandeur to a bedrock of eroticism.

A literary analysis of the origins of Kabbalah reveals the complex web of storytelling, tradition, and mysticism contained in this revered sacred practice. Reprint. 10,000 first printing.
Antuiserum
Plays rather fast and loose with what little translation it does offer and plays with the reader too by saying kabbalah text in general and the Zohar in particular shouldn't BE clarified when translated which is the opposite of what you want in um...an English book about kabbalah. The best part of this book is the dated bibliography of other books on the subject. Spend the money you would have bought this with on the on Pritzker Edition of the Zohar, since the agenda there is actually to bring kabbalistic ideas to a wider audience. In this book there seems to be an elitist attitude that these texts should be seen by only a (very) chosen few and understood by even fewer than that- which is the opposite of what you want in a book on spirituality..
GawelleN
David Rosenberg book is the first I read which does not explain Kabbalah. Like love, Kabbalah canot be explained.
The reader gets help to FEEL what Kabbalah is. The authors, David Rosenberg and Rhonda Rosenberg, use modern day sensations and ideas, accessible to a contemporary. I include Rhonda Rosenberg as an author, as she contributed to the most important chapter of the book, Part III, "How to receive the Kabbalah"
The lecture of this chapter is a sufficent reason for buying this book. No other spiritual book I read managed to 'click' more precisely that kabbalistic sensitivities, - from the same root as poetry - that any human being alive must have in various incipient stages.
The reader can not be passive. S/he must participate, s/he must execute its own 'applet' (pre-existent computer-program-like soul component)) to respond to that 'click'.
The Rosenbergs describe the reader pre-requirements as follows: "an affinity for play and abstraction, along with a sympathy for the necessity of it..."
In other words, did you ever dream? Then, after waking up, did you wonder what the dream means? Did you ask - one step further - why does one dream? Why don't we sleep solidly all the nights of our lives? If these questions are significant for you, then you MUST read at least part III of this book.
Because "the desire to come upon meanings in disguise is analogous to the wandering of the rabbi companions in Zohar." As we drive cars to work and let the mind wonder for a bit, as we stop a moment to reflect upon anything that happens to us, we realize that that is more to everything we see around us. Someone concealed to our mind meanings. We are so used to see the decor manufactured by ourselves, - cities and countrysides, shopping centres and TV's - that we read a meaning "in a more natural and wild way, unconfined by the human culture " only by surprise, as if by an accident.
One starling comparison is the author scrutiny of the spiritual in such TV icons as in an "Oprah Winfrey Kabbalah's show".
Because there is spiritual that encompasses everything we are, just as environmental ecology seems to have an intelligence of its own, that will survive long after people, - homo sapiens - will disappear as biological species.
Kabbalah, is another way to see life. We received wonderful messages and feelings, not visible by others. To see what this means, just look at the book jacket, with an inset detail of child from picture of Hieronymous Bosch. Is there a child? Or they are two children? One looks at us. The other looks elsewhere. One is terrified. Other is suspicious. Both are innocent. Or , are they? Why Bosch painted it? Why David Rosenberg wrote this book?
Can any one answer?
Dordred
Dreams of Being Eaten Alive is a personal rendering of selections of the Zohar, the central mystery text of the Kabbalah, written mostly by Moses de Leon but attributed to an earlier author, Rav Shimon bar Yohai. The textual trick of claiming authorship for others mirrors, according to author David Rosenberg (a Bible expert, and coauthor with Harold Bloom of the The Book of J), the technique of the writers of the Old Testament in attributing their writings to others or the Other. This is a highly idiosyncratic book and the most idiosyncratic section, Part III, How to Receive the Kabbalah, with its references to Oprah and defense of Derrida's immersion in reading the individual, the author admits was cowritten with his wife, Rhonda Rosenberg. The multiple authorship cloud of attribution (here real, but in the Kabbalah to imaginary) is reminiscent of the literary trickery of Pushkin's Eugene Onegin or Nabokov's quasi-comical critical glosses. Although hardly exhaustive, there are fascinating teasers in this translation and commentary--such as Rav Abba weeping when he sees a fruit turn into a bird and fly off a tree. This is alleged to be more than a metaphor, as birds due disperse trees so perhaps (in some sped up view of theGarden of Eden, say) there is an ecological reality to what at first seems just fantasy or poetry. (This book does a strange move towards what it considers to be evolutionary ecology, or "frontier ecology," probably because they believe in the possibility there for a convergence of truth and myth.) One gets the feeling in this gloss both of protonovelistic technique in the medieval writers of the Kabbalah and of the attempt to reveal their experience by mystics knowing the superior effectiveness of oblique communiques. The book is also racy, with salacious tales of wet dreams and interdimensional miscegenations, as well as violent, with stories of babies being eaten alive and whatnot by their demonic mothers. The sense of play and fun of the kabbalah comes across together with its deep mystery. This book was a nice combination of respectful and irreverent, and seemed to be informed in equal parts by the poetic sense of the artist and the careful analysis of the scholar. At one point the authors remark to the effect that since Gershom Scholem (school and golem?) and Freud there has been a virtual absence of Jewish intellectuals reinvigorating the rich spiritual tradition from which both the Old Testament and the Kabbalah originate.
Dreams of Being Eaten Alive: The Literary Core of the Kabbalah ebook
Author:
David Rosenberg
Category:
Judaism
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1344 kb
FB2 size:
1503 kb
DJVU size:
1426 kb
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Publisher:
Three Rivers Press; First Paperback Edition edition (September 4, 2001)
Pages:
208 pages
Rating:
4.7
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