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Mind at Ease: Self-Liberation through Mahamudra Meditation ebook

by Traleg Kyabgon


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Mind at Ease: Self-Libera.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Mind at Ease: Self-Liberation through Mahamudra . Traleg Kyabgon is exceptionally learned and has undergone extensive training in both Buddhist studies and contemporary mind sciences.

Traleg Kyabgon is exceptionally learned and has undergone extensive training in both Buddhist studies and contemporary mind sciences. His work will bring tremendous benefit to all spiritual seekers in the West. -Khenchen Thrangu, author of An Ocean of the Ultimate Meaning and tutor to Karmapa XVII.

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Mahamudra-which means "great seal" or "great symbol," referring to the symbol or mark of ultimate reality, or. .

Mahamudra-which means "great seal" or "great symbol," referring to the symbol or mark of ultimate reality, or emptiness-points to the true nature of mind as well as the ultimate insubstantiality of all things. Издание: 1st Shambhala Ed.

Includes bibliographical references and index

Includes bibliographical references and index.

In this uniquely insightful overview and practice guide, Traleg Kyabgon presents a thorough introduction to the Kagyu lineage's Mahamudra tradition. The author's approach is straightforward-he presents the Mahamudra teachings as a means of seeing things in, as he says, "a positive and open light. Even things we might normally regard as bad and undesirable can be interpreted in a more uplifting way due to the expansiveness of the Mahamudra vision.

In this book the reader is not confronted with any content that might confuse a direct understanding of mahamudra as can be the case with some translations of classical mahamudra texts.

In this uniquely insightful overview and practice guide, Traleg Kyabgon presents a thorough introduction to the Kagyu lineage's Mahamudra tradition. The author's approach is straightforward—he presents the Mahamudra teachings as a means of seeing things in, as he says, "a positive and open light. Even things we might normally regard as bad and undesirable can be interpreted in a more uplifting way due to the expansiveness of the Mahamudra vision." Mahamudra—which means "great seal" or "great symbol," referring to the symbol or mark of ultimate reality, or emptiness—points to the true nature of mind as well as the ultimate insubstantiality of all things. The book includes an exploration of Mahamudra fundamentals and thorough explanations of Ground, Path, and Fruition Mahamudra, including meditation techniques for investigating, experiencing, and contemplating these teachings.
Dagdage
Traleg Kyabgon is a Tibetan who directs the Kagyu-Evam Buddhist Institute in Melbourne, Australia. He has studied extensively in the West. He says in his introduction that he is attempting to keep the book simple and accessible. He succeeds, IMHO. As he says on page 225, "in approaching the spiritual path, we need some understanding of what the journey involves." This deep book is incredibly easy to read and understand, despite its stated lack of personal experiences. Unlike many others, the author includes the reasons behind the practices, the whys and wherefores as well as the how. He also includes many, many exercises/meditations with very fine descriptions of the practices. He also defines terms amazingly well-shining light on them with great clarity. His Glossary is wonderfully written. I especially liked his definition of "Interested Humility" (page 242) vs. "devotion." Within the text, he beautifully defines and describes such important experiences as Bliss, Clarity, and Mental Spaciousness (page 199) as well as delineating important distinctions such as meditative experiences and realizations (page 198). The only point I still have a problem with (despite his quoting the Dalai Lama on page 125) is the difference between soul and Buddha nature. It seems to me that they are addressing the Hindu atman which is not necessarily the idea in the West. For example, Jung's archetype of the Anima or Animus differs from the atman. It would be interesting to hear a Mahamudra analysis of such Jungian ideas.

Additionally, the author introduces some new terminology which is helpful to the student's understanding. For example, "conceptual overlays" (page 195) and mystical Mahayana (Mahamudra, Dzogchen, and some Zen sects on page 137); also he explains the relationships among memory, mindfulness, and being in the now (page 146). Throughout the book is practical. It even includes suggestions for using a zafu (small round cushion for the buttocks) on top of a zabuton (larger square cushion to help the ankles) on page 144. Furthermore, he provides a fine description of the use of the Four Immeasurables (pages 92-117) as an prelude to the main Mahamudra meditation and refers to the applicability of them and Lojong (mind training: see Pema Chodron's "Start Where You Are" for particulars on this and "Noble Heart" for another view of the Four Immeasurables) for the Mahamudra practitioner (page 218). I don't think I've heard that anywhere before either in Lojong books/tapes or Mahamudra & Dzogchen ones. Nevertheless, as the author explains on page 202, insight does not come from purely from learning.

The author's explanation of the value of differing perspectives is well worth quoting at length:

"In Buddhism, it is openly conceded that having different terminologies and different concepts gives us a different understanding of something. Multiple perspectives are valued because particular perspectives will necessarily yield corresponding understandings. Sometimes people become annoyed by these multiple perspectives and begin to question which one is real and which ones are false. The Buddhist position is that they are all true within their given context. They are also necessary because in Mahayana Buddhism the teachings have to accommodate the needs of a diverse range of people, all potential beneficiaries of the Dharma. Any single perspective that is dogmatically thrust upon a multitude of diverse individuals will fail to inspire many and is unlikely to benefit more than a few. [however] Different perspectives have to form a coherent whole with an underlying thematic link between the variations, otherwise they would cease to be perspectives on the same thing" (page 136).

Finally, the appendix (pages 229-35), "Precious Sun" Padma Karpo's Spiritual Advice is poetic, insightful, profound, and enlightening.
Zeueli
Traleg Kyabgon's instruction in Mahamudra meditation is a lucid, highly-readable and practical explication of the Kagyu way of meditation. The author is a wonderful communicator whose mastery of both the philosophical and practical aspects of these teachings is guided by his "discriminating wisdom" in imparting them to lay people in the modern western world (although his home base of Australia is arguably more southeastern than western). One of the key points he makes is that despite all the talk in Buddhism about meditation as empiricism, the practices are actually ways of recognizing and internalizing the Buddhist view of reality. After giving us a "crash course" in that view with an eye to practice, he outlines the three meditation approaches of shamatha-mindfulness / tranquility, vipashyana-insight / analysis, and mahamudra-direct experience of the mind, which actually extends to the entire spectrum of experience. Having said this, I must add that I did not read this book because I was searching for this information; rather, I had hoped to find a sort of "universal" practice for spiritual realization that might coalesce with any religious point of view. As one who believes in God and the soul (not that I claim to understand either), I soon recognized that this is not the case with Mahamudra -- nor can it be the case. Every system or path has its own unique character, and it is a mistake to try to "mix and match" as if one were in the supermarket picking out food items for the coming week. Traleg Kyabgon is very out front about this and many other common misconceptions and confusions. Yet despite my getting what I was not looking for, I found that there was much to learn from this volume and recommend it to anyone who wishes to explore the endless mystery of the mind.
Bu
Such a wonderful teacher for western students. History of Mahamudra, very clear discussions on points of theory and practice, and rightly pointed out meditation instruction to go with the emphasized teaching points - all this is included in this very easy to read book.
Vinainl
I have been practicing mahamudra meditation for over thirty years, and "Mind at Ease" is by far the clearest exposition of mahamudra I have encountered. In this book the reader is not confronted with any content that might confuse a direct understanding of mahamudra as can be the case with some translations of classical mahamudra texts. Not to belittle those texts--they are amazing and certainly very useful, but if the motive is to find encouragement to undertake mahamudra meditation practice, you can do no better than start with this book.
Nilador
I fail to understand descriptions of this book as very clear & readable. With all due respect, it seems excessively wordy. Why use 5 or 6 words when you can use several paragraphs? Much of the text concerns what mahamudra is NOT. Clearly I am not an intellectual as this approach leaves me running for simplicity. Is that the point?
Bine
Excellent book on meditation and Buddhism. This is very accessible, but doesn't seemed dumbed-down or overly westernized.
Pad
This book is brilliant and as relevant today as when it was written. There is a prayer in this book titled Precious Sun / Padma Karpo's Spiritual Advice that should be read by all faiths and all of humanity. One does not need to be Buddhist to know it it true and to be inspired by it.
A great book by a wonderful teacher. It is probably necessary that one have taken the Bodhisattva vow and has ome clue as to the Middle Way view in order to really appreciate it, But I am sure anyone can get something fromit.
Mind at Ease: Self-Liberation through Mahamudra Meditation ebook
Author:
Traleg Kyabgon
Category:
Other Eastern Religions & Sacred Texts
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1290 kb
FB2 size:
1810 kb
DJVU size:
1813 kb
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Publisher:
Shambhala; 1st Shambhala Ed edition (June 29, 2004)
Pages:
288 pages
Rating:
4.8
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