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G.W.F Hegel: Theologian Of The Spirit (Making of Modern Theology) ebook

by Peter Hodgson


Hegel is generally classified under the heading 'philosophy' rather than theology - he believed the universe to be rational, and this was important in every aspect of his philosophy.

Hegel is generally classified under the heading 'philosophy' rather than theology - he believed the universe to be rational, and this was important in every aspect of his philosophy. Hegel envisioned his word 'Phenomenology of the Spirit' as just an introduction to a larger system he had in mind - at over 700 pages, this is some introduction! Unfortunately, much of Hegel's hoped-for publication and writing was never completed.

Hegel: Theologian of the Spirit (Making of modern theology). 056708552X (ISBN13: 9780567085528).

The book then gives practical help for preparing and delivering sermons that are meaningful and appropriate. Hegel: Theologian of the Spirit (Making of modern theology).

This is a book on Christian theology, not a comparative religions text, but it does cover the .

This is a book on Christian theology, not a comparative religions text, but it does cover the main branches of Christianity, looking at modern theology based upon personality, geography, and theological approach. The first section examines the lives and work of some of the most significant theological voices to dominate the century, most of whom were European (no surprise, given the dominance of the European voices in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries as well).

Peter C. Hodgson engages the speculative reconstruction of Christian theology that is accomplished by Hegel's .

He analyses Hegel's concept of the object and purpose of the philosophy ofreligion, his critique of the theology of his time, his approach to Christianity within the framework of the concept of religion, his concept of God, his reconstruction of central Christian themes, and his placing of Christianity among the religions of the world.

Hegel was putting the finishing touches to this book as Napoleon engaged .

Hegel was putting the finishing touches to this book as Napoleon engaged Prussian troops on October 14, 1806, in the Battle of Jena on a plateau outside the city. On the day before the battle, Napoleon entered the city of Jena. Later that same day Hegel wrote a letter to his friend the theologian Friedrich Immanuel Niethammer: I saw the Emperor – this world-soul – riding out of the city on reconnaissance. G. W. F. Hegel: The Phenomenology of Spirit, translated by Peter Fuss and John Dobbins (University of Notre Dame Press, 2019).

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Peter Crafts Hodgson. Offering the only anthology of Hegel's religious thought, Vanderbilt University's Professor Peter C. Hodgson provides sympathetic and clear entree to the German philosopher's religious achievement through his major relevant texts starting with early theological writings and culminating with Hegel's1824 lectures on the philosophy of religion.

G. Hegel: Theologian of the Spirit. Anticipating as it does the modern world's drive to think historically, dialectically, and wholistically, Hodgson shows that Hegel's thought might well tutor the next century as much as it did the last.

Presents a radical rethinking of the roots of modern theology Reveals how . Graduate students and philosophy of religion students will find this book indispensable.

12. 1 Hegel as a Theologian of the Spirit hegel’s life and career in brief1 The year 1770 wa. .

Peter hy-of-Religion. 1. Hegel and Christian Theology A Reading of the Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion PETER C. HODGSON 1. 2. Hegel and Christian Theology. 3. 3 Great Clarendon Street. Oxford ox2 6dp Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. 12. 1 Hegel as a Theologian of the Spirit hegel’s life and career in brief1 The year 1770 was auspicious for art and thought. The spring of that year brought the birth of Friedrich Ho¨lderlin and William Wordsworth, and the winter, Ludwig van Beethoven.

In this critical introduction to the science-theology debate, Peter E. Hodgson draws on his . The connections with theology are explored throughout. The concluding section draws discussions together and makes an important new contribution to the debate. Hodgson draws on his experience as a physicist to present the results of modern physics and the theological implications.

Illustrated throughout by cases of the author and others, this book tells how to analyze a congregation so that the preacher's sermon really fits the audience. The book then gives practical help for preparing and delivering sermons that are meaningful and appropriate.
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This volume on the works of Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel is part of a series by Fortress Press entitled 'the Making of Modern Theology: Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Texts'. Each of the volumes in the series focuses upon one particular theologian of note. These volumes are of use to students, seminarians, ministers and other readers interested in the development of theological ideas in the modern and postmodern world. Each volume is a reader of key texts from the theologian highlighted - the text entries are annotated a bit by the editors, and the editor of each volume provides an introduction setting the general stage for context and understanding.
Editor Peter Hodgson describes Hegel as being a significant theologian of the spirit for Christianity. Hegel is generally classified under the heading 'philosophy' rather than theology -- he believed the universe to be rational, and this was important in every aspect of his philosophy. Hegel envisioned his word 'Phenomenology of the Spirit' as just an introduction to a larger system he had in mind -- at over 700 pages, this is some introduction! Unfortunately, much of Hegel's hoped-for publication and writing was never completed.
Many of the texts used here in Hodgson's compilation are newly translated; explorations of Hegel's explicitly theological thought are rare. Much of Hegel's work was not published during his lifetime; much remains collected along lines of interest to philosophers looking at metaphysics and politics (Hegelian principles are very strong in later Marxist frameworks). The difference between the philosophy of religion and theology is always a tricky one to navigate; with Hegel, this can be even more confusing, given that his immediate successors rarely agreed amongst themselves about Hegel's original intentions and meanings.
Hodgson's description of Hegel as a theologian of the spirit has much to do with the ontological view of God -- both philosophy and theology get at the truth; God as spirit is a self-revealing and relational being knowable to the world in different ways. He goes beyond subjective spirit and objective spirit towards an absolute, an infinity that contains within itself the finite.
Hodgson draws on the large body of Hegel's work in a largely chronological rather than topical arrangement. Early theological writings (pre-1800) are followed by Hegel's writings at Jena; the major work 'Phenomenology of the Spirit' was done in 1807. Tracts from the Encyclopedia of Philosophical Sciences were done from 1817 to 1830; during this period, other writings and lectures are presented.
Each volume in this series also has a selected bibliography section -- this one for Hegel is divided into collected works of Hegel, major single works by Hegel (primary sources in English), and works about Hegel's religious thought. The book well indexed. This is a very good book for scholarship. The translations of the works from the original German is new, preserving some of the language uses (masculine pronouns for God) while modifying others (gender neutral translations for terms such as Mensch, Menschen). With regard to Hegel's philosophical framework, translation can be particularly difficult for the term 'being' -- Sein, Dasein, Seiende, and Wesen are variously translated; notes accompany problematic texts.
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I should refrain from saying anything about who, if anyone might, would be adhering to the wrong religious doctrines in our own times. Though the legacy of Hegel after his death is controversial, this book allows us to consider him "a philosopher of religion" (p. 1), for whom "the proper object of theology is religion itself, the relationship." (p. 32). With his knowledge of philosophy, Hegel was able to break religion down into four stages, in which the Greek religion based on art was considered the second stage. Political superpower ideology seems to follow this as the Roman stage followed the height of Greek civilization.
"The time of grief came when the Romans smashed the living individualities of the peoples, putting their spirits to flight and destroying their ethical life, before extending the universality of their lordship over the dismembered singular parts. At the time of this dismembering for which there was no reconciliation, and of this universality that had no life--in this boredom of the world when peace was lord over all the civilized earth--the original identity had to rise out of its rent condition, it had to lift its eternal force above its grief and come again to its own intuition. Otherwise the human race must have perished inwardly." (p. 88).
I was most impressed by the connection between humor and legal oppression that arises in this situation, as if Hegel was also aware that comedy and law play to the same audience.
"The latter [the Stoic autonomy of thinking, which passes through the movement of the skeptical consciousness to find its truth in that shape which we have called the unhappy self-consciousness] knows what the validity of the abstract person amounts to in actuality and equally in pure thought. It knows that such validity is rather a complete loss; it is itself the conscious loss of itself and the divestment of knowledge from itself. We see that this unhappy consciousness constitutes the counterpart and completion of the comic consciousness that is perfectly happy in itself. Into the latter all divine being returns--the complete divestment of substance. The unhappy consciousness, on the other hand, is conversely the tragic fate of the certainty of self that aims to be in and for itself. It is the consciousness of the loss of all essentiality in this certainty of itself, and of the loss of even this knowledge of itself--the loss of substance as well as of self. It is the anguish that finds expression in the harsh words, God is dead." (p. 117)
"Under the [Roman] legal status, then, the ethical world [of the Greeks] and the religion of that world are submerged in the comic consciousness, and the unhappy consciousness is the knowledge of this total loss. It has lost the worth it attached to its personality both as immediate and as mediated or thought. Trust in the eternal laws of the gods is silenced, just as the oracles, which pronounced on particular questions, are dumb. The statues are now only stones from which the living souls have flown, just as are words from which faith is gone." (pp. 117-118).
A portion of Hegel's famous Preface to his Phenomenology of Spirit is included in this book, in which he treats the word "God" as if being the subject of a sentence is the only proper use of the word:
"The need to represent the absolute as subject has found expression in the propositions: God is the eternal, the moral world-order, love, and so on. In such propositions the true is just baldly posited as subject, but it is not presented as the movement of reflecting itself into itself. In a proposition of this kind one begins with the word God. Of itself, this is a meaningless sound, a mere name; it is only the predicate that says what God is, and gives God content and meaning; only when we get to the end of the proposition does the empty beginning become actual knowledge. This being so, it is not clear why one does not speak solely of the eternal, the moral world-order, and so on, as the ancients did, of pure concepts, of being, the One and so on, of what is the meaning, without adding the meaningless sound as well. But it is just this word that indicates that what is posited is not a being or essence or universal in general, but something reflected into itself, a subject." (pp. 95-96).
This book might be worthwhile for anyone who needs to brush up on how Hegel thinks about reflection. In July 1802, `The Critical Journal of Philosophy' published Hegel's FAITH AND KNOWLEDGE, in which Hegel criticized the philosophies of Kant, Jacobi, and Fichte. The Introduction of that work is called The Culture of Reflection (pp. 73-82) in this book, and reveals Hegel's awareness of the deepest thinkers of his own time:
"Of course, the inner must be externalized; intention must become effective in action; immediate religious sentiment must be expressed in external gestures; and faith, though it flees from the objectivity of cognition, must become objective to itself in thought, concepts, and words." (p. 75).
"If an artist cannot give truth to what actually exists . . ." (p. 81) "then he will take refuge in feeling, in yearning and sentimentality as his remedy against actuality, spreading tears on the cheeks of the vulgar and bringing an `Oh Lord' to their lips. Thus his figures will indeed look away beyond the actual situation toward heaven, but they will do so like bats that are neither bird nor beast, and belong neither to earth nor to sky." (p. 82).
Near the end of the book, Hegel's lectures on religion include the story of Adam, Eve, the tree of knowledge, and "Moreover, the serpent says that by eating the fruit of the tree Adam and Eve will become like God, and this appeals to human pride." (p. 234). Indeed.
G.W.F Hegel: Theologian Of The Spirit (Making of Modern Theology) ebook
Author:
Peter Hodgson
Category:
Religious Studies
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1799 kb
FB2 size:
1842 kb
DJVU size:
1445 kb
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Publisher:
T&T Clark; 1 edition (June 1, 2002)
Pages:
318 pages
Rating:
4.9
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