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Giant Bluefin ebook

by Douglas Whynott


I enjoyed Douglas Whynott's "The Sugar Season" and was drawn to this earlier book about Bluefin tuna because of my time spent in New England - most summers for the past 30 years.

I enjoyed Douglas Whynott's "The Sugar Season" and was drawn to this earlier book about Bluefin tuna because of my time spent in New England - most summers for the past 30 years. For example, last year my family watched fishermen unload a 960 pound Bluefin at the Wentworth Marina in New Hampshire with a truck from "Maguro America" waiting to pack it and ship it off to Japan.

Giant Bluefin - Douglas Whynott. Bluefin liked to get close to the heat of the day, to cruise with their dorsal fins above water, like sharks or dolphins. Making water, trailing wakes, by triangular aspect revealing their courses, a purple shade moving along, that was what the bluefin harpooners looked for. That was the show.

by Douglas Whynott (Author). Whynott portrays these "true sons of the whalers of old" with sympathy and understanding in a book filled with depth and drama. Andrea Barrett, Outside"". Whynott's superb report on the bluefin harpoon fishery takes readers to the old whaling grounds off Cape Cod and shows that the adventure and controversy associated with that extinct American industry survive today, on boats with names like Scratcher, Back Off, and Tenacious.

Whynott's attention transcends his ostensible subject until it becomes a profound look at the human condition.

Whynott portrays these 'true sons of the whalers of old' with sympathy and understanding in a book filled with depth and drama. Andrea Barrett, Outside. A Unit of Water, A Unit of Time. Whynott's attention transcends his ostensible subject until it becomes a profound look at the human condition. San Francisco Chronicle.

Giant Bluefin was my way of writing a book about Cape Cod. It is dedicated to my grandfather, the grandson of a seacaptain, and to my two daughters. The world's largest finfish, the bluefin tuna can grow to 10 feet and weigh 1500 pounds

Giant Bluefin was my way of writing a book about Cape Cod. The world's largest finfish, the bluefin tuna can grow to 10 feet and weigh 1500 pounds. Whynott (Following the Bloom) takes us through two seasons of bluefin harpoon fishing off the New England coast from Cape Cod to Maine.

Bluefin tuna can grow up to 10 feet long and weigh as much as 1,500 lb. but most are in the 300- to 500- lb. range. Not bad, notes Whynott, for a fish that just 20 years ago was sold as cat food for five cents a pound

Farrar, Straus and Giroux. PART ONE The 1992 Season ( 1 ) THE SHOW.

Farrar, Straus and Giroux. THIS WOULD be an afternoon show, Brad Sampson figured. Praise for Giant Bluefin.

The world's largest finfish, the bluefin tuna can grow to 10 feet and weigh 1500 pounds.

Publisher Description. He introduces Bob Sampson of Barnstable, whose family has lived and fished on Cape Cod since colonial times. Many bluefin fishermen, Sampson included, use spotter planes; Whynott goes out with one pilot.

Douglas Whynott is an American writer who has written and published four critically acclaimed books. He writes what is considered to be literary journalism or narrative nonfiction. The subjects of his books range from migratory commercial beekeepers and the beekeeping industry, to the bluefin tuna fishery in New England, a boatyard in Maine, and a veterinary clinic in New Hampshire

Bluefin tuna are the largest finfish in the ocean and the fishermen who harpoon them, one at a time, lead a traditional, athletic, even heroic life, according to Whynott. The author spent two seasons in the company of a 47 year-old Cape Cod harpooner and tells the story of his "passionate hunt for his noble and elusive prey," as well as the struggle between the fishermen and conservationists. No scholarly trappings. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.
Kajikus
An informative, if average treatise about the struggle of the commercial bluefin fisherman. Gets a bit technical with respect to population estimates,quotas,pricing, etc. I was looking for something more along the lines of Linda Greenlaw's "The Hungry Ocean" wherein character development,and description of the fisherman's environment take precedence.
Mardin
An interesting look at today's bluffing fishery. A mixture of science and the characters who make up the fishing industry, as well as the market forces that drive it.
Alsath
excellent reading with verisimilitude, held my interest throughout and made me want even more to get out there and partake in the goodness.
Dorizius
Awesome Book!!
Goll
I didnt even buy this.
Puchock
INFORMATIVE
OTANO
I thoroughly enjoyed this book and found it surprisingly engrossing. It introduced me to a whole other world, the world of commercial fishing, one I knew little about, a world filled with rivalries, friendships, a long history, a world I think most Americans don't appreciate. Though focusing primarily on the harpoon fishery of the giant bluefin tuna or "jumbo bluefin" (known by the scientific name of _Thunnus thynnus_) of New England waters, the author Douglas Whynott discusses fishermen who use other methods (such as trolling or using a purse seine) as well as problems that the fishing industry and that individual fishermen face in general as well as some topics in marine biology.
The giant bluefin fishery is a lucrative market, with individual fish often worth $40 or more a pound (when fat after having feed all season on local prey fish), some fish bringing in at market prices as high as $50,000 per fish (though often much lower than that). The highest prices are obtained in Japan, where red tuna meat (maguro) is highly prized. Individual fish are packed in ice and air-lifted over to Japan, each specimen analyzed there at market in a method not unlike a raw diamond is regarded by professional jewelers so that the best cuts could be made, all so Japanese restaurant goers can pay upwards of $75 for a single serving of raw fish.
Whynott relates how the bluefin tuna fishery has come a long way; the bluefin was once called the "horse mackerel" and worth a mere five cents a pound, generally being served as cat food. In fact in the early 20th century they were even thought to be poisonous and were primarily caught so that the fish could be boiled to produce lamp oil. Fishermen who specialized in bluefin have often had to get other jobs when the fishing season was over, whether fishing for cod or other fish, shrimping, harvesting mussels, or even working non-fishing jobs, something that has been slowly changing as the market for bluefin has become more lucrative though not still quite prevalent.
The fish obtained for the sushi market are provided by the harpoon fishery of New England, an industry that while using spotter planes to locate schools, sophisticated devices to measure water temperature, and a knowledge of esoteric regulations in international committees and national organizations that govern quota size for each season's catches (regulations that are often the subject of intense debate, a topic well-covered in the book), Japanese market preferences (to properly grade fish often takes year of experience, as each fish taken to market is graded on freshness, color, fat, and shape), and even currency fluctuations (as upward or downward exchange rates of the yen versus the dollar can mean large differences in prices received), still relies on a single man hand-throwing a bronze-headed harpoon at a fast moving fish (albeit a harpoon rigged so that a powerful 800-volt electric shock can be delivered to the animal). No other method will do, as purse seining damages the fish and no other method can reliable catch the giant bluefins that the Japanese so highly prize. The harpooners operate from boats that are often called "stick boats," constructed with long pulpits built off the bow and out over the water, the pulpit sometimes more than 25 feet in length (designed so that they could be cranked up while in harbor), a stand at the end of which is where the fishermen hurls his 12 foot harpoon.
What made this book so interesting in part was the portrayal of individual fishermen, the author following their trials and tribulations over several seasons. Whynott focused mainly on two fishermen - Bob Sampson, captain of the _Scratcher_ and his son Brad Sampson - and a spotter pilot, Fred Brooks or "Brooksie," going out with them in all manner of weather, relating their hopes and aspirations and the many problems that they have faced. It was not hard not to root for them after a while.
The tuna themselves are of course well-covered in the book, a fish species that arrives every year to the Gulf of Maine to fatten on the locally abundant schools of mackerel, sand eels, and herring, a rich feeding ground that attracts all manner of marine life including several species of sharks, whales, and porpoises, throughout the summer increasing their body weight by more than 7.5 percent per month. The bluefin is a fascinating animal, the largest of the finfish (up to ten feet in length and a thousand pounds in weight), among the fastest (which can swim in 50 mile an hour bursts, able to beat their tail fins at frequencies of thirty cycles per second, providing 90 percent of their locomotive power), and one of the most migratory of all animals (with some tagged individuals known to have made 8,000 mile round trips feeding and spawning forays through the Atlantic). Bluefins have a very sophisticated physiology, having large blood volumes and the highest proportion of oxygen among fishes, concentrations of hemoglobin as high as that of humans, their gill surface area the highest of any fish species, producing what is the metabolically active of all fish species; an animal that is "warm-blooded" or endothermic, able to maintain body temperatures of between 77 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit while swimming in waters between 45 and 86 degrees from Brazil to the Gulf of Mexico and the Mediterranean to Norway. The bluefin is truly one of the ocean's top predators, essentially a tropical fish that has evolved to take advantage of underutilized food resources in subpolar waters.
An absolutely excellent book, one I would highly recommend.
I thought this was a great book to learn about the bluefin and the fishng for them. It is crazy the amount of money these fish go for. These fish hav incredible power I believeit states in here that if you tied a bluefin to a marlin tail to tail the blufin would win. great book give it a try.
Giant Bluefin ebook
Author:
Douglas Whynott
Category:
Biological Sciences
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1700 kb
FB2 size:
1696 kb
DJVU size:
1106 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Farrar Straus & Giroux; 1st edition (June 1, 1995)
Pages:
241 pages
Rating:
4.9
Other formats:
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