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The Man Who Found Time: James Hutton and the Discovery of The Earth's Intiquity ebook

by Jack Repcheck


James Hutton (1726-1797) was an exceptional amateur geologist who was the first to put together a compelling explanation of the age of the Earth.

James Hutton (1726-1797) was an exceptional amateur geologist who was the first to put together a compelling explanation of the age of the Earth. Written in a breezy style, it will not satisfy scholars but it nonetheless presents a compelling introduction for non-specialists in the history of geology. A Scottish physician, Hutton dabbled in all types of scientific inquiry, especially the practical aspects of farming, crops yields, and the like

Discovery of the Earth’s Anquity, by Jack.

Discovery of the Earth’s Anquity, by Jack. Huon (1726-1797) with one of the most famous. incidents in the history of geology. aernoon in 1788, Huon set sail in a small boat with. two much younger friends, John Playfair and Sir James. Hall, to look for evidence of deep me in the rocks. 118+ million publications.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station10. cebu on June 13, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Start by marking The Man Who Found Time: James Hutton . Hutton wrote his 1795 Theory of the Earth while he was in great pain.

Start by marking The Man Who Found Time: James Hutton And The Discovery Of Earth's Antiquity as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. I also really liked that Repcheck didn't end his book with Hutton's death, but continued on to chase out the unfolding story of geology as a science. Hutton's friend Playfair, who worked unceasingly to popularize Hutton's views, with more success than Hutton ever had, provides a particularly interesting epilogue to Hutton's life. So Playfair took on the honorable of clarifying his friend's remarkable scientific discoveries.

There are three men whose life’s work helped free science from the strait-jacket of religion. Two of the three—Nicolaus Copernicus and Charles Darwin—are widely heralded for their breakthroughs. The third, James Hutton, is comparatively unknown, yet he profoundly changed our understanding of the earth, its age, and its dynamic forces. A Scottish gentleman farmer, Hutton’s observations on his small tract of land led him to a theory that directly contradicted biblical claims that the Earth was only 6,000 years old.

Repcheck argues that Hutton's work was lost to history because he could not describe his findings in graceful and .

Repcheck argues that Hutton's work was lost to history because he could not describe his findings in graceful and readable prose. Unlike Darwin's Origin of the Species, Hutton's one and only book was impenetrable. A marvelous narrative about a little-known man and the science he founded, The Man Who Found Time is also a parable about the power of books to shape the history of ideas.

Repcheck's writing style is comfortable and easy to digest. He provides a good sense of the man, the environment, and the accomplishment.

Because of some committed believers who came later, this understanding became dominant in the nineteenth century. Repcheck's writing style is comfortable and easy to digest. This book is thought-provoking, sort of like looking through a telescope for the first time. 2 people found this helpful.

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A reasonable brief discussion of the life of James Hutton in relation to the Scottish Enlightenment. Geologists know Hutton as one of the founding fathers of the science and any student of history is aware of the giants of the Scottish Enlightenment (Watt, Hume, et.

A reasonable brief discussion of the life of James Hutton in relation to the Scottish Enlightenment. No new ground is covered ( except perhaps the brief discussion of Hutton's illegitimate son). If you have never heard of Hutton or some of the other Enlightenment scientist, this book is a good introduction. One issue not discussed at any length concerns Hutton's fascination on the origins of granites.

Jack Repcheck, himself a champion of books, argues that Hutton's work was almost lost to history because he was unable to describe his findings in graceful and readable prose: Unlike Darwin's Origin of the Species, Hutton's one and only book was impenetrable.

There are four men whose life's work helped free science from the straitjacket of religion. Three of the four - Nicolaus Copernicus, Galileo Galilei, and Charles Darwin - are widely heralded for their breakthroughs. The fourth, James Hutton, is comparatively unknown. A Scottish gentleman farmer, Hutton's observations on his small tract of land led him to a theory that directly contradicted biblical claims that the Earth was only 6,000 years old. Telling the story not only of Hutton, but of the rich intellectual milieu of the Scottish Enlightenment, which brought together some of the greatest thinkers of the age - from David Hume and Adam Smith to James Watt and Erasmus Darwin - The Man Who Found Time is an enlightening, engaging narrative about a little-known man and the science he established.
Doktilar
This book is billed as a Hutton biography, but it is more about the Scotland in which he lived than about Hutton per se. In fact, of the 200 pages of text, less than about 50 pages are actually devoted to Hutton himself. Instead, the book discusses the history of Scotland, Edinburgh, the University of Edinburgh, the period of the Scottish Enlightenment, the attempt of Bonny Prince Charlie to take the crown of England and Scotland, and the geology of Scotland. These topics are very interesting and do provide the background for Hutton’s life and how he came to believe that geology clearly showed that the earth was far, far, older than the 6,000 of so years that was determined from the Old Testament.

I liked the book and found the wealth of information to be very interesting and well presented. However, the book has, in my opinion, a serious flaw that prevents me from giving it five stars. Save for one map of Scotland, there are no photographs or drawings in the book, and this is, in my opinion, a very serious deficiency for any book covering geology. Geology requires numerous drawings and photographs to show the various rock strata and how they develop.

I recommend this book to anyone interested in Scotland and the background of how Hutton came to his ideas, but NOT for someone who needs a detailed biography of the man himself, or for someone in need of information concerning geology, and certainly not for someone seeking a geology text.
Welahza
If you are a reader of Rudwick's or Gould's writings then this will be a disappointing effort. I enjoy learning about the history of the sciences. James Hutton was prominent in pushing back geologic time far beyond prehistorical limits of the Bible. That point is made abundantly clear in this book. Unfortunately, we never really visit the localities that were so decisive for Hutton's developing theory. No pictures; no maps. Not even samples from Hutton's writings. We appreciate Hutton's work but only superficially. To be honest, aside from some of the history of Edinburgh, I took away very little from the book. To get a serious review of Hutton, Lyell, Playfair and company, begin with Darwin's Century by Eisley then explore Rudwick's extensive writings. If all you desire is cursory look then this short work (210 pgs) will suffice.
Memuro
I'm glad to have read this book and feel smarter for having done so. It was interesting in a number of ways, providing an appreciation of the significance of "deep time", and the forces that affect the development of new ideas. The description of Edinburgh (Scotland) in the "Age of Enlightenment" was useful, as life in the 1700's was very different than now. Many of the sciences were new or not yet established, so people like Hutton were largely writing on a blank page, working on their own powers of observation. Hutton's realization of the age of the Earth was insightful and controversial, and while not coming into acceptance until after his death, it has stood the test of time.

Repcheck's writing style is comfortable and easy to digest. He provides a good sense of the man, the environment, and the accomplishment. This book is thought-provoking, sort of like looking through a telescope for the first time.
LadyShlak
It is hard to find a more significant figure in the history of geology. James Hutton (1726-1797) was an exceptional amateur geologist who was the first to put together a compelling explanation of the age of the Earth. This interesting and accessible book presents in a compelling manner the life and work of this remarkable Scotsman. Written in a breezy style, it will not satisfy scholars but it nonetheless presents a compelling introduction for non-specialists in the history of geology. A Scottish physician, Hutton dabbled in all types of scientific inquiry, especially the practical aspects of farming, crops yields, and the like. While engaged in this effort he began to study the surface of the Earth, gradually forming questions and methods of resolving them.

This book is a breathless survey of the life and career of James Hutton as a gentlemen scholar, his work on the age of the Earth, and his place in the larger story of the Scottish Enlightenment. Trained as a physician, Hutton lived a life of ease where he undertook scientific investigations and scientific farming. In terms of his work on the geology of the Earth, he really published three items. The first is an abstract of a talk that he gave in Edinburgh in 1785 outlining in general terms his conclusion that the Earth must be far older than the 6,000 years usually thought because of the analysis base on the Bible. He then published a longer paper, "Theory of the Earth; or an Investigation of the Laws Observable in the Composition, Dissolution, and Restoration of the Land upon the Globe," in 1788 in the "Transaction of the Royal Society of Edinburgh" that created a huge stir among scientists and led to denunciations from several zealous academics. In 1795 he published a two volume "Theory of the Earth, with Proofs and Illustrations" that sought to answer his critics, but written as he was rapidly declining this work proved insufficient to counter their arguments.

Hutton was correct that the Earth is much older than the biblical account would lead one to believe. He was also right to posit a dynamic structure at the Earth's core and the shaping of land masses based on cataclysm and upheaval, though probably not a universal flood. Because of some committed believers who came later, this understanding became dominant in the nineteenth century.

This is a very fine, easy read about an important topic. It ranges far across the eighteenth century, especially commenting on the Scottish Enlightenment, which gave us several great thinkers including Adam Smith and David Hume as well as Hutton. It even explores the Scottish rebellion of the 1740s led by Bonnie Prince Charlie in a chapter that seems misplaced in this volume. Overall, "The Man Who Found Time" is a useful introduction to an important subject. For those seeking a more detailed, scholar account, I recommend Dennis R. Dean's "James Hutton and the History of Geology" (Cornell University Press, 1992). For those interested in the larger questions of the Earth's geology, especially the age of the planet, I recommend G. Brent Dalrymple "The Age of the Earth" (Stanford University Press, 1991).
The Man Who Found Time: James Hutton and the Discovery of The Earth's Intiquity ebook
Author:
Jack Repcheck
Category:
Earth Sciences
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1583 kb
FB2 size:
1285 kb
DJVU size:
1253 kb
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Publisher:
ReadHowYouWant; Large Print edition (January 21, 2013)
Pages:
304 pages
Rating:
4.2
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