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Probability Theory: The Logic of Science ebook

by G. Larry Bretthorst,E. T. Jaynes


ISBN-13: 978-0521592710 tantalizing ideas. the conceptual points that underlie his attacks are often right o. Science. This is a work written by a scientist for scientists. As such it is to be welcomed. The reader will certainly find things with which he disagrees, but he will also find much that will cause him to think deeply not only on his usual practice by also on statistics and probability in general.

Probability Theory: The Logic of Science. Jaynes intended this book to serve as both a reference and a text book. ii PROBABILITY THEORY – THE LOGIC OF SCIENCE. E. T. Jaynes died April 30, 1998. Before his death he asked me to nish and publish his book on probability theory. Volume I – principles and elementary applications.

This page intentionally left blank. Probability theory the logic of science. Before his death he asked me to finish and publish his book on probability theory. PROBABILITY THEORY THE LOGIC OF SCIENCE E. Jaynes. I struggled with this for some time, because there is no doubt in my mind that Jaynes wanted this book finished. Unfortunately, most of the later chapters, Jaynes’ intended volume 2 on applications, were either missing or incomplete, and some of the early chapters also had missing pieces.

Going beyond the conventional mathematics of probability theory, this study views the subject in a wider context. It discusses new results, along with applications of probability theory to a variety of problems. The book contains many exercises and is suitable for use as a textbook on graduate-level courses involving data analysis. Aimed at readers already familiar with applied mathematics at an advanced undergraduate level or higher, it is of interest to scientists concerned with inference from incomplete information.

Probability theory the logic of science. Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, São Paulo. Cambridge University Press The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge, United Kingdom Published in the United States by Cambridge University Press, New York ww. ambridge. org Information on this title: ww. I struggled with this for some time, because there is no doubt in my mind that Jaynes wanted this book nished.

In this book, E. Jaynes dispels the imaginary distinction between 'probability theory' and 'statistical inference', leaving a logical unity and simplicity, which provides greater technical power and flexibility in applications

In this book, E. Jaynes dispels the imaginary distinction between 'probability theory' and 'statistical inference', leaving a logical unity and simplicity, which provides greater technical power and flexibility in applications. This book goes beyond the conventional mathematics of probability theory, viewing the subject in a wider context. New results are discussed, along with applications of probability theory to a wide variety of problems in physics, mathematics, economics, chemistry and biology

Jaynes considers the frequency interpretation of probability as far too limiting

The mathematical theory of probability is consistent in-dependent of any interpretation. However, many consumers of this theory regard probability as a mathematical construct that predicts frequency. Jaynes considers the frequency interpretation of probability as far too limiting. Instead, probability should be interpreted as an indication of a state of knowledge or strength of evidence or amount of information within the context of inductive rea-soning.

Personal Name: Bretthorst, G. Larry. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

This book goes beyond the conventional mathematics of probability theory, viewing the subject in a wider context. Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-59271-0 - Probability Theory: The Logic of Science E. Jaynes Frontmatter More information. Now results are discussed, along with the application of proba-bility theory to a wide variety of problems in physics, mathematics, economics, chemistry and biology. It contains many exercises and problems, and is suitable for use as a textbook on graduate level courses involving data analysis.

Jaynes' posthumous book, Probability Theory: The Logic of Science (2003) gathers various threads of modern thinking about Bayesian probability and statistical inference, develops the notion of probability theory as extended logic, and contrasts the advantages of Bayesian techniques with the results of other approaches.

Going beyond the conventional mathematics of probability theory, this study views the subject in a wider context. It discusses new results, along with applications of probability theory to a variety of problems. The book contains many exercises and is suitable for use as a textbook on graduate-level courses involving data analysis. Aimed at readers already familiar with applied mathematics at an advanced undergraduate level or higher, it is of interest to scientists concerned with inference from incomplete information.
Dancing Lion
One of the most important works of the 20th century (or any century) in both philosophy and physics, Jaynes' work lays the foundation for the physical ontology and epistemology of science. This book is the completion of what amounted to a lifetime of effort on Jaynes' part, dating back to the "Mobil Lectures" where he first laid out this approach to knowledge. It follows the world of Richard Cox, who demonstrated that Bayesian probability theory naturally follows from three simple axioms that also serve to establish the connection between evidence and plausible belief.

In my opinion, this book is a required read for anyone who wishes to understand precisely how the scientific worldview is, in a mathematically defensible sense, the best possible worldview, the one that lets us optimally use evidence to develop an interlocked Bayesian network of evidence supported beliefs that can change and evolve as the evidence is accumulated. It also shows the critical connections between physics and statistical mechanics and Shannon's theorem in computational information theory, laying the foundation for a fair bit of modern physics as it demonstrates that physical entropy and information entropy are very much one and the same thing, from a certain point of view.
Jake
A good book, but an extremely poor kindle implementation. The equations seem quite readable in the sample (because we checked before buying), but in the actual book, they are in tiny type and are pretty much unusable. There’s $50 wasted. So very sorry to report this, because it would have been so convenient to have an electronic version to carry when traveling.
Kuve
I haven't finished reading this book yet, but the chapters I read so far gave me so much understanding of issues that are either obscure or absent in other probability and statistics books - but are of great practical importance - that I decided recommend it here.
It is true Jaynes' style is caustic against positions that are contrary to his owns. But he is very convincing on the reasons he gives to pinpoint the big holes in the so called "orthodox" school of probability and statistics.
Besides, the book is very lengthy, without being prolix, on its explanations, making it very pedagogical. Constrasting with that, nevertheless, Jaynes sometimes proposes examples that I believe only a mathematician or physicist with specific knowledge of the subject mentioned by the author will be able to follow. But those parts do not impact understanding of the main ideas.
It must be noted also that "Probaility theory: the logic of science" is mainly a theory book. Its goal is to present probability as an extension of deductive logic. It only brings a small number of exercises.
The best thing about this book, at least for me, is having a style that really makes me look forward reading the next page, something very rare for a technical book. In fact, the only other book I came across that had that virtue was the "Feynman Lectures on Physics".
Dalallador
This is a classic - perhaps THE classic exposition of Bayesian statistics for physical scientists. Among other things, Jaynes strove to rediscover and rehabilitate Sir Harold Jeffreys, the geophysicist whose attempts to resurrect Laplacian/Bayesian statistics fell afoul of his fellow Cambridge professor, Sir Ronald Fisher, whose works (including Design of Experiments) were among the most influential of twentieth century statistics. Jaynes's own formidable achievements in adapting Bayesian statistics to physics and chemistry are legendary. There is also some amusing byplay in the form of a running critique (often confined to footnotes) of "Willy" Feller, the Princeton mathematician who authored a major textbook on probability theory.
Zyniam
I really think everyone should read this book, and R. T. Cox's book. This books make plain the philosophical and mathematical reasons that all statistics should be Bayesian. It only looses a star, because the book is not complete. Jaynes died before he could finish it. One of his students prepared the book for publication. I wish he had finished it while he was at it.
Meri
A classic
Uriel
I have rarely learned so much from one book. This book is somewhat unusual among mathematical texts in that it is heavy on prose and (compared to other texts) light on equations. However, don't get the idea that it is any less rigorous! It simply focuses on precisely what most math books neglect: exhaustive explanation of the concepts...and to very good effect. Jaynes (and his editor) are possibly the most articulate writers of mathematics I've ever read. If you can read equations like English, you may not appreciate this. The rest of us will.
Summarizing the content: The book very exhaustively demonstrates how Bayesian statistical approaches subsume rather than compete with "orthodox" (sampling theory-derived) statistics. Importantly, it begins by deriving the sum and product rules (which in other texts are typically presented as axioms) from "common sense" considerations. In other words, what is usually treated as "given" in other statistics texts is shown to, in fact, depend on even more fundamental (and, thus, indisputable) considerations of what constitutes rational plausible reasoning. This places the whole endeavor of statistics on firmer ground than any other text I've seen. The book is worth buying for the first few chapters alone, but it just gets better from there.
Jaynes goes on to link Bayes rule to information-theoretic considerations and build up probability as an extended form of logic (as the title implies). In some cases this yields a new and deeper understanding of "orthodox statistical practice." In others it exposes (and explains) the absurdities of strictly frequentist approaches. Again, I have rarely learned so much from one book.
One caveat: It does not at all require a statistics background, but, obviously, some of Jaynes (mildly polemical) discourse will, of course, be lost on you without it.
Probability Theory: The Logic of Science ebook
Author:
G. Larry Bretthorst,E. T. Jaynes
Category:
Mathematics
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1990 kb
FB2 size:
1890 kb
DJVU size:
1734 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (June 9, 2003)
Pages:
753 pages
Rating:
4.3
Other formats:
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