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The Lonely American Large Print Edition: Drifting Apart in the Twenty-first Century ebook

by Jacqueline Olds


This is a book for our time, a book that calls all of us to take a serious look at the social and psychological costs of the way we live today. It tells a story I have never seen in print anywhere else about how each of us are shutting ourselves off from the larger world and the almost unconscious process we all use to do that. It's not a long book to read.

Jacqueline Olds and Richard S. Schwartz set out to understand the cultural imperatives, psychological dynamics, and physical mechanisms underlying social isolation

Jacqueline Olds and Richard S. Schwartz set out to understand the cultural imperatives, psychological dynamics, and physical mechanisms underlying social isolation. In today's world, it is more acceptable to be depressed than to be lonely-yet loneliness appears to be the inevitable byproduct of our frenetic contemporary lifestyle. According to the 2004 General Social Survey, one out of four Americans talked to no one about something of importance to them during the last six months.

The Lonely American book.

The Lonely American: Drifting Apart in the Twenty-first Century. Jacqueline Olds, Richard S. Schwartz. Скачать (pdf, . 1 Mb).

Book Overview According to the 2004 General Social Survey, one out of four Americans.

book by Jacqueline Olds.

Americans in the twenty-first century devote more technology to staying connected than any society in history, yet somehow the devices fail us. .The book struck a chord and seemingly endless pub1. 2. The Lonely American.

Americans in the twenty-first century devote more technology to staying connected than any society in history, yet somehow the devices fail us: studies show that we feel increasingly alone. Our lives are spent in a tug-of-war between conflicting desires- we want to stay connected, and we want to be free. lic debate about whether or not Putnam was ignoring new forms of connection that were every bit as effective as the waning old forms.

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Request PDF On May 1, 2009, RICHARD M. WAUGAMAN and others published The Lonely American: Drifting . This study examines the different ways in which Stravinsky's music became known to the American public between 1910 and 1917. WAUGAMAN and others published The Lonely American: Drifting Apart in the Twenty-First Centuryby Jacqueline Olds, . and Richard S. Schwartz, . Schwartz show how the American way of life can lead to social isolation. Learn More . Shipping & Delivery.

Thomand
This book spoke to me as few others have done. Many of its pages described my life as a loner in fine detail. I have never been married and "The Lonely American's" chapter on marriage and marital relationships showed me that staying single is what I want to keep on doing By the authors' writing,, marriage creates about as many problems as it solves.. I was somewhat surprised and somewhat relieved that solitude and unsatisfying relationships are so common. In a way, knowing that helps me deal with my solitude better. It would be good to have at least one meaningful relationship. However, as the book points out, people get more reclusive the longer they live alone. I am imagine most, like me, are even less willing now than when they were younger to accommodate others' foibles and irritating .idiosyncrasies The authors' description of most friendships as being rather tenuous and unreliable dovetails with my experience. Considering the book's contents overall, I would say it does a great job describing solitude in America. However, it endorses religion and religious connections in a church as a means of making friendships. I have always found church's a waste of time for single people..
Dancing Lion
Would recommend to anyone considering therapy for depression. Nice historical perspective, and provides an alternate view on the use of pharmaceuticals that is rarely hear from therapists.
Skilkancar
This book was very insightful. I enjoyed it.
Gindian
This was a great book to read. It tells a story I have never seen in print anywhere else about how each of us are shutting ourselves off from the larger world and the almost unconscious process we all use to do that. It's not a long book to read. I am glad I read it. I will keep it for a reference in the future and have encouraged many friends and colleagues to read it.
Uylo
This is one of my favorite books. If you've wondered why people act so miserable today and can't put your finger on it this book is an excellent start.
JOGETIME
Significant topic but the book reads more like a chat about the topic than an actual thesis. Doesn't help that too many ideas/concepts are suggested and not examined. And absolutely no attempt is made to correlate their observations with longer term (and greater) socio-economic trends. There are many good books to be written on alienation in modern American culture. This wasn't one of them.
Chillhunter
There is no question that Americans are growing increasingly disconnected from each other. Bruce Putnam's classic "Bowling Alone" established statistically that Americans are no longer as community oriented and social as there parents and grandparents were.

As Spring erupts in my community, a pleasant urban setting, you can walk down the streets and rarely see children playing outside. The most frequently observed people on the streets are young mothers and their children or people walking their dogs. In recent municipal elections, roughly 7% of the registered voters bothered to cast a ballot.

Many people complain of feeling lonely. Studies, such as those cited by the authors, indicate that more and more people have fewer and fewer people in whom they confide, people they think of as friends.

It is argued by some that certain political movements desire this kind of social isolation. The authors don't make that argument and in this review, I won't either.

First, the authors are readable. They write well and clearly intend their work for a general audience. Kudos to them for this.

Second, unlike Putnam's work, the various studies they cite are not the heart of the book, but rather are offered as supporting material. They rely heavily on anecdotes from their respective practices. (Both are MDs.)

The result is a well done summary of the problem, its probable causes, it real and projected effects and a chapter that touches upon what may be done to slow the process.

It is, on the whole, a personal book - and in many ways the better for it.

Reading this book left me longing for people to discuss it with - perhaps proof of the pudding. This is not a likely title to show up on a book club reading list.

Overall, this is a well done look at the increasing (and, in my opinion, the increasingly dangerous) loneliness in America. It is not a cure-all and isn't intended to be. It is indeed a worthwhile read for anyone concerned with the future well being of our American society.

Jerry
This book follows the contemporary style for mainstream humanities/social science books, meaning that it is written in a conversational style (that more adept readers may find tiresome, repetitive, and obvious) and supports its points with a less-than rigidly logical patchwork of professional anecdotes, scientific studies having results that do not unambiguously prove what they are suggested to prove, and common-sense reasoning.

The main topic is interesting, but the book is certainly not a page-turner. I found the most engaging chapter to be the section concerning the the interaction between the mental health profession and cultural attitudes towards loneliness. Ironically, one chapter in the book is basically an extended fallacy that could easily play a part in the lonely American phenomenon - confusing a legal contract (marriage) with a healthy committed sexual/romantic relationship.

Perhaps the authors saw this as outside the scope of their work, but I found the lack of discussion concerning the role of xenophobia in promoting social isolation to be a major issue. The repercussions of racism and lesbiphobia, for example, must certainly play a significant part in the psychological damage wrought.
The Lonely American Large Print Edition: Drifting Apart in the Twenty-first Century ebook
Author:
Jacqueline Olds
Category:
Relationships
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1471 kb
FB2 size:
1150 kb
DJVU size:
1485 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Beacon Press (February 1, 2009)
Pages:
336 pages
Rating:
4.7
Other formats:
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