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The Father Hunt (Nero Wolfe) ebook

by Rex Stout


Rex Stout REX STOUT, the creator of Nero Wolfe, was born in Noblesville, Indiana, in 1886, the sixth of nine children of John and Lucetta Todhunter Stout, both Quakers. Shortly after his birth.

Rex Stout REX STOUT, the creator of Nero Wolfe, was born in Noblesville, Indiana, in 1886, the sixth of nine children of John and Lucetta Todhunter Stout, both Quakers. REX STOUT, the creator of Nero Wolfe, was born in Noblesville, Indiana, in 1886, the sixth of nine children of John and Lucetta Todhunter Stout, both Quakers. Shortly after his birth the family moved to Wakarusa, Kansas. He was educated in a country school, but by the age of nine he was recognized throughout the state as a prodigy in arithmetic.

Wolfe was born in Montenegro and keeps his past murky

Wolfe was born in Montenegro and keeps his past murky. He lives in a luxurious brownstone on West 35th Street in New York City, and he is loath to leave his home for business or anything that would keep him from reading his books, tending his orchids, or eating the gourmet meals prepared by his chef, Fritz Brenner.

Rex Todhunter Stout (/staʊt/; December 1, 1886 – October 27, 1975) was an American writer noted for his detective fiction. His best-known characters are the detective Nero Wolfe and his assistant Archie Goodwin, who were featured in 33 novels and 39 novellas between 1934 and 1975. In 1959, Stout received the Mystery Writers of America's Grand Master Award.

The Father Hunt book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

The Father Hunt book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Father Hunt (Nero Wolfe, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

For specific publication history, including original magazine appearances, see entries for individual titles. The Nero Wolfe Cook Book.

Rex Stout (1886–1975) wrote dozens of short stories, novellas, and full-length mystery novels, most featuring his two indelible characters, the peerless detective Nero Wolfe and his handy sidekick, Archie Goodwin. Chapter 1 It happens once or twice a week. Lily Rowan and I, returning from a show or party or hockey game, leave the elevator and approach the door of her penthouse on top of the apartment building on Sixty-third Street between Madison and Park, and there is the key question. Mine is, Do I stay back and let her do it?

Nero Wolfe is a fictional character, an armchair detective created in 1934 by the American mystery writer Rex Stout. Wolfe's confidential assistant Archie Goodwin narrates the cases of the detective genius

Nero Wolfe is a fictional character, an armchair detective created in 1934 by the American mystery writer Rex Stout. Wolfe's confidential assistant Archie Goodwin narrates the cases of the detective genius. Stout wrote 33 novels and 39 short stories from 1934 to 1975, with most of them set in New York City. Wolfe's residence, a luxurious brownstone on West 35th Street, features prominently in the series. Many radio, television and film adaptations have been made from the stories

What others are saying.

What others are saying. ISBN: 9780670261406 Publisher: Viking Press Published Date: 1969. Man's brain, enlarged fortuitously, invented words in an ambitious attempt to learn how to think, only to have them usurped by his emotions.

After the war Stout returned to writing Nero Wolfe novels, and took up the role of gentleman farmer on his estate at. .Novels can be browsed alphabetically by title at the page

After the war Stout returned to writing Nero Wolfe novels, and took up the role of gentleman farmer on his estate at High Meadows in Brewster, north of New York City. He served as president of the Authors Guild and of the Mystery Writers of America, which in 1959 presented Stout with the Grand Master Award - the pinnacle of achievement in the mystery field. Stout was a longtime friend of the British humorist P. G. Wodehouse, writer of the Jeeves novels and short stories. Novels can be browsed alphabetically by title at the page. Titles of the novella collections are listed alphabetically on the page.

All pretty Amy Denovo wants to find the father she has never seen, but she can’t afford Nero Wolfe’s outlandish fees . . . or can she? Suddenly she’s knocking on the oversized detective’s door with a parcel full of bills in hand—and a quarter of a million hidden in her closet. It’s all part of a nest egg left by her unknown father. But when Wolfe and his able assistant, Archie Goodwin, begin to trace the money to the man, they make a startling discovery: Amy’s father murdered her mother—and now he may be after her. “It is always a treat to read a Nero Wolfe mystery. The man has entered our folklore.”—New York Times Book Review
Blacknight
This is one of Stout's novellas, and it's good. Yes, the mystery itself and it's solution are a little thin (in that one of the mysteries is solved right away and you don't get a chance to try & solve it yourself, and the other one is one you could pretty much never solve yourself, because there are no real clues), as is true in many of Stout's books. However, the plot is fun and exciting, many of the characters are interesting, and the stakes are incredible. Also, it's on of the few cases that Archie, not Nero Wolfe, solves (well, at least he solves one of the mysteries--there are two, but spoiler alert!, they turn out to be related). The only part I would change is the fact that, as in many of Stout's books, there are too many characters and a lot of them have almost no personality (or at least that Stout tells us about). The characters he does choose to go into a little bit of detail about could still use a little more personality--do they talk a certain way, have a certain type of humor, are they smart, sarcastic, etc. Still, this is a fun little book, and I think most people will enjoy it, especially if you're a Nero Wolfe fan.
Meztisho
Jacques Barzun said that Archie Goodwin was a 20th century Huck Finn, and one of the most memorable characters in American literature. Years ago, I picked up this slim volume of three novellas at a used bookstore, and it was my introduction to Archie, Nero and the gang. I savored the writing, fell in love with the characters, and was entertained by the plots. The author’s love of language is hard to miss. Barzun also said about Rex Stout, “If he had done nothing more than to create Archie Goodwin, Rex Stout would deserve the gratitude of whatever assessors watch over the prosperity of American literature.” With apologies to Mr. Barzun, if “Three Men Out” had done nothing more than to introduce me to Archie Goodwin, it would deserve my gratitude. It has it. It’s witty, clever and written with panache.
White_Nigga
Rex Stout's "Three Men Out" (1954) is the 23rd book in his "Nero Wolfe" series. This one is not a novel. It's another collection of three short stories: 1) "Invitation to Murder" (1953), 2) "The Zero Clue" (1953), and 3) "This Won't Kill You" (1952). The first of those short stories is very good. It's written in good Stout/Wolfe form with a good plot and mystery. The second story, is OK. The premise of what the people in the story are doing is a bit silly and the mystery a bit weak, but it's still good Stout/Wolfe. But, the third story is pretty bad. Most of it reads like a Crime Drama instead of a Mystery. But, the biggest issue I have with it is how everything falls in line for the solution. It's pretty trite and just doesn't read like what we'd expect from a Stout/Wolfe story. So, averaging the scores, I get an OK 3 stars out of 5 for the book.
Zulkigis
I thought I had read all of the Nero Wolfe stories by Rex Stout. These were 3 new stories to me. The context is NYC in the 1950s or about 60 years ago. So there are anomalies. For example, baseball is still played by the NY Giants in NYC although they are now located in San Francisco, and that NYC location for them is the setting for one of the stories. However, the usual characters, Nero Wolfe, Archie Goodwin his mobile assistant, and Inspector Cramer, NYC police, are present and play their usual roles with the sort of variation that makes me love this series. There are the usual potential nasties. For example, In the first story there is a poisoning alleged with regard to one of three women. Poisoning of a man who owns the house and monies and who is in a wheelchair and cannot leave the house. I high recommend these short stories for anyone who can (as I can) overlook the anomalies and enjoys the interaction of the main characters with different situations.
Xurad
I'm a huge Nero Wolfe fan, so I read everything Rex Stout wrote with these characters. Maybe that's why this one bothered me so much. Don't misunderstand me, all the usual Wolfe eccentricities are there, and Archie is as good at the snappy banter as ever. I would have been quite satisfied if I did t know his characters so well. But because I do, the things that are a little off bother me a lot. Towards the end, Archie warns Cramer to be careful getting up from the red chair. This is off, because Cramer has been tweaking Wolfe's nose for years by being able to rise of the seat very smoothly and without using his hands to leverage himself up.

It felt a bit flat all around, as if there was too much effort to get every character trait in there, and I
A few times I would have sworn he pulled parts from other books. S

But there are far worse attempts out there, so I give a three, for just not living up to the standard Rex Stout set for us.
huckman
And oh how I hate for the book to end. Well not really, because I reread all of them every few years. Usually in order and this was #43 so I'm closing in on the end of this round of reading. Never met a Nero Wolfe book I didn't like. They don't have to be read in order to be enjoyed or understood. Enough! Read and enjoy.
Anyshoun
I thought it was about three men but it is three short stories and about three different guys not all in one story. Three stories are good. Nice to read while waiting for someone. As usual I did not get one bad guy right and in last story did not even have a clue. I think there must be clues in the stories and I just don't get them. Only one murder mystery did I ever get it first. That was another author. At any rate enjoyed the stories. Liked I could read them in one sitting. Thoroughly enjoyable reads. Highly recommend them.
This book is predictable only in the sense that it's quality is what I expect of Nero Wolfe stories. I don't read Nero Wolfe books for the great writing, although there's nothing wrong with the writing. I read them because Rex Stout is a good story teller and because Archie Goodwin and Nero Wolfe are interesting characters. I think Stout's genius was in pairing these two very different characters. So, if you buy this, make yourself a cup pf tea or pour yourself a nice glass of wine and settle in for a good read. Enjoy!
The Father Hunt (Nero Wolfe) ebook
Author:
Rex Stout
Category:
Mystery
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1287 kb
FB2 size:
1575 kb
DJVU size:
1894 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Bantam (January 2, 1995)
Pages:
208 pages
Rating:
4.9
Other formats:
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