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Shrine of the Desert Mage (Parsina Saga #1) ebook

by Stephen Goldin


Volume I of the Parsina Saga  . Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Shrine of the Desert Mage (Parsina Saga as Want to Read

Volume I of the Parsina Saga  . Start by marking Shrine of the Desert Mage (Parsina Saga as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Volume I of the Parsina Saga. Thus begins the Parsina Saga, a journey through a world of djinni, flying carpets and high adventure in exotic realms - with the fate of the world at stake. Starting from the fabled holy city of Ravan, two paths diverge that will take their respective travelers to the farthest reaches of Parsina. The black-hearted thief Hakem Rafi comes into possession of the ultimate power of evil, while the storyteller Jafar al-Sharif and his daughter Selima begin a longer involuntary journey that will test the limits of their ingenuity. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Thus begins the Parsina Saga, a journey through a world of djinni, flying carpets and high adventure in exotic realms - with the fate of the world at stake. Books related to Shrine of the Desert Mage. The City of Brass (The Daevabad Trilogy, Book 1).

Thus begins the Parsina Saga, a journey through a world of djinni, flying . His current wife is fellow author Mary Mason. So far they have co-authored two books in the Rehumanization of Jade Darcy series. In the Arabian Nights world of Parsina, Jafar the storyteller must escape from the dungeons of the Holy City and outwit the world's mightiest wizard. Sci-fi & Fantasy Epic Fantasy. One fee. Stacks of books.

The Parsina Saga is an exciting, romantic Arabian Nights . . Start by marking Shrine of the Desert Mage (Parsina Saga as Want to Read

The Parsina Saga is an exciting, romantic Arabian Nights .

Shrine of the Desert Mage. The Storyteller and the Jann. Crystals of Air and Water. Network (GNN), Stephen Goldin’s mailing list. Thank you for reading books on BookFrom. Treachery of the Demon King. Connect with stephen goldin. Learn more about him at his Web site. Visit his book site, Parsina Press. Get updates on his doings at his blog, The Ingesterie. Twitter handle: stevegoldin.

Starting from the fabled holy city of Ravan, two paths diverge that will take their respective travelers to the farthest reaches of Parsina. But first, they must fool the world's greatest wizard into believing that they, too, are practitioners of the mystic arts

This first volume of the ‘Parsina Saga’ introduces the world of Parsina, with its divine city of Ravan central to its .

This first volume of the ‘Parsina Saga’ introduces the world of Parsina, with its divine city of Ravan central to its politics, beliefs and ultimate fate. The tale begins with the individual stories of a number of disparate characters, from princes to thieves, with storytellers, magicians and elemental entities filling the space between. I would certainly recommend the ‘Shrine of the Desert Mage’ by Stephen Goldin as an enjoyable and rewarding read; for its rich prose, clever and well-crafted story and its interesting and engaging re-telling of the age-old tale of good versus evil.

The threat of evil has become dangerously real in Parsina. The magic urn containing the demon Aeshma has been stolen. Book in the Parsina Saga Series).

When a magic urn containing the spirit of an army of demons is stolen from the Royal Temple, Jafar, his daughter Selima, and exiled prince Ahmad set out on an enchanted adventure to recover the urn, and keep the peace in the holy city of Ravan
Nilasida
If you are looking for a fantasy that is not a clone of furry-footed folk in a quasi-England or another gloomy barbarian stomping through civilization, The Shrine of the Desert Mage might be it. This is fantasy that draws from such tales as those told by Scheherazade; there are heroes and villains confronting deserts and djinn. It is light fantasy, no albino sword-wielder angst here, but it is not silly fantasy filled with puns or slap-stick humor; this book is just an enjoyable read about places that those who liked Harryhausen's Sinbad films will truly enjoy.

The Shrine of the Desert Mage sets up all the characters and the action to come in the Parsina Saga in a reasonable space --While four volumes in total, this is not a series that suffers the page bloat all too common in fantasy.-- and leaves the reader at the conclusion of it wanting to immediately pick up the following volume, The Storyteller and the Jann. The Storyteller and The Jann (Parsina Saga)

Lastly, for those reading on a Kindle, this e-book has clearly been edited. Unlike so many Kindle products, there are no typos, OCR issues, etc. to mention in this volume. It reads like a book.
Ubranzac
I waited for decades for Goldin to finish the Parsina Saga. I think he rushed it, I wish he had taken a couple more volumes to wrap it all up. These are lush alternate-universe books with incredibly detailed prose, wonderful characters, and a quite acceptable quest-oriented plot. You'll love Cari the righteous Jann, the schemer and great wizard Akar, brave and modest Selima, and especially the storyteller turned wizard. The Prince of Ravan is maybe a little too good to be believed, and his unworthy brother, ambitious stepmother, and the base thief who steals the urn containing the most powerful and evil of all the Djinn, of all are maybe a little too evil to be believed. Or maybe not. Maybe the thief and the second Prince of Ravan are on a level with Ariel Castro. I can't quite believe Ariel Castro existed and was as evil as he was. It's hard to imagine, but he really existed and really did unthinkable things, and he's not alone. There are a lot of evil people out there, and many of them are still getting away with vile things. So maybe it's not so hard to believe in the potential of evil. I won't put spoilers here. If you like well-written fantasy, you'll love these books. They are internally consistent, full of food descriptions (I always enjoy exotic food in books!) and will bring the Arabian Nights type fantasy world fully to life for you. This is William's wife. I don't know if he's ever found time to read these, but if he gets a chance, in between all that workbench book stuff, I know he'll love them. Putting this same review on all volumes that are available.
Purestone
I bought this by chance and was blown away - great story and great writing!
Cae
So far this is the only series in an Arabian setting that I have really enjoyed. It's harder than you can believe to find a good story involving genies, wizards and adventure outside of Aladdin. This is a great read from beginning to end. It has some adult themes so I wouldn't recommend it for kids, but for adults it really has everything.

When I was first reading this series in the 80s the fourth book wasn't out yet, so I decided as a teenager to write the author and ask when it was coming out. Not only did he respond but he also mailed me a signed, numbered copy of another of his books, Assault on the Gods! Not only a wonderful writer but a thoughtful, generous man as well.
Jelar
Stephen Goldin has managed to revive and revitalise an old, classical and largely overlooked branch of the art of storytelling. ‘Shrine of the Desert Mage’ is a gripping and quite endearing story in the mould of ‘The Arabian Nights’. Instead of a collection of disparate tales, however, this tells a single and gripping story of the beginnings of an epic change in the Cycles of the world.

Richly set within an imaginary middle-eastern country, the author introduces the reader to a tried and tested formula of good versus evil, one that can usually be relied upon to lends itself so well to an epic scale. ‘Shrine of the Desert Mage’ does not disappoint in this respect, but achieves it with a care and consideration only ever found in experienced, adept and accomplished authors.

This first volume of the ‘Parsina Saga’ introduces the world of Parsina, with its divine city of Ravan central to its politics, beliefs and ultimate fate. The tale begins with the individual stories of a number of disparate characters, from princes to thieves, with storytellers, magicians and elemental entities filling the space between. Each story, though, is a gripping and enchanting thread in itself, but Stephen Goldin consummately manages to interweave them to form a wonderful tapestry of a tale.

He does this with a sparing touch upon his characters, however. They at first appear mere ciphers, rather shallow and one-dimensional - in keeping with the fable nature of the work, it has to be said - but they do steadily grow a little deeper and richer. It would be fair to say that this is a story driven more by plot, setting and an exquisitely fashioned system of supreme powers and elemental magic than by the cast of characters involved. They do grow enough by the end of this volume, however, to engender some empathy. Enough to want to read the next volume from a feeling of involvement, and not just curiosity about where the story will lead.

This is clearly a very well researched work, but be prepared. It will introduce you to a whole raft of often unfamiliar names and terms. There are many exotically named items of clothing, furniture, architecture and the like. Although there’s a rich seam of this narrative colour, the author is careful in its use, always making it clear what is being referred to. It certainly improves the setting of, and background to the story, but may slow some readers down. This reader, though, was particularly taken by the clever geographical names used, each carefully evoking real places in our own history. By it, a more immediate sense of location was fostered, so much so that the tale seemed as though it could almost have been truly handed down from an ancient Persian or Indian hand.

In keeping with the subject matter and story, Stephen Goldin’s prose is quite ‘old style’, and it may take a little while for more modern readers to feel comfortable. It often uses now unfashionably long and sometimes convoluted sentences, but they’re almost always carried off by the high standard of writing. It does mean that a rich mine of delightful phrases and turns of language await the reader, such as: ‘half a feather’s weight from chaos’, and ‘The city’s original lustre wore thin, revealing the common clay beneath the glazed facade.’

I would certainly recommend the ‘Shrine of the Desert Mage’ by Stephen Goldin as an enjoyable and rewarding read; for its rich prose, clever and well-crafted story and its interesting and engaging re-telling of the age-old tale of good versus evil.

I received an advance copy of this book from the author in return for an honest review.
Shrine of the Desert Mage (Parsina Saga #1) ebook
Author:
Stephen Goldin
Category:
Mystery
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1428 kb
FB2 size:
1334 kb
DJVU size:
1537 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Spectra (May 1, 1988)
Rating:
4.2
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