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The Black Angel ebook

by Cornell Woolrich


The Black Angel is a terrific example of Woolrich suspense. Cornell Woolrich was one of the most accomplished noir writers of the century and is often ranked just behind Hammett, Chandler, and Gardner.

The Black Angel is a terrific example of Woolrich suspense. This is noir at its quintessential best. But there exists within the story, something darkly romantic, intoxicating even. He also wrote under the pen names William Irish and George Hopley. Dozens of films were adapted from his books, including Black Angel, Fear in the Night, Rear Window, The Bride Wore Black, and Original Sin. His work is dark and brooding and often features a protagonist who has sinned and cannot ever get his or her hands clean.

Cornell Woolrich CONTENTS 1. Angel with Whisk Broom 2. Visiting Angel 3. Announcement of Widowhood 4. Farewell Scene 5. Revery by Matchlight 6. Crescent 6–4824. 1. Angel with Whisk Broom. 3. Announcement of Widowhood.

Works by or about Cornell Woolrich in libraries (WorldCat catalog). Cornell Woolrich Papers at the Columbia University Rare Book and Manuscript Library, New York, NY. "Cornell Woolrich and the Tough-Man Tradition of American Crime Fiction" by Christine Photinos (Clues: A Journal of Detection 2., 2010). The melodrama star as a noir film heroine: The Trace of Some Lips (1952)" by Roberto Carlos Ortiz (article in Spanish about a Mexican adaptation of "Collared", by Cornell Woolrich).

The Black Angel book. Cornell Woolrich was called the Father of Noir, and I listened to this book because I have been dipping back into some noir, thanks to my reading of some graphic novels by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips. And I discovered Woolrich had written the short story, It Had to Be Murder, on which Hitchcock’s Rear Window had been based.

Cornell Woolrich Cornell Woolrich. On a mild midwestern night in the early 1940s, Johnny Marr leans against a drugstore wall.

A classic is back in print! This hypnotic thriller, by one of the originators of the noir form, exposes its heroine to a waking nightmare. In this classic crime novel, a panic-stricken young wife races against time to prove that her convicted husband did not murder his mistress. He’s waiting for Dorothy, his fiancée, and tonight is the last night they’ll be meeting here, for it’s May 31st, and June 1st marks their wedding day.

Статистика на 2020 yжaсaeт!

Статистика на 2020 yжaсaeт!

Short fiction collections. Children of the Ritz (1927). The Black Angel (1943).

Short fiction collections. The Black Path of Fear (1944). Rendezvous in Black (1948).

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Writing in first person from the wife’s viewpoint, Woolrich evokes her love and anguish and, finally, desperation as she becomes an avenging angel in her attempt to rescue her husband from execution. Thriller & Crime Women Sleuths. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

When her husband is arrested for the murder of his supposed girl friend, a young woman struggles to prove him innocent and bring the true killer to justice
Thorgaginn
Another winner. Woolrich certainly had a way with phrases. With conveying a certain type of feeling. Like of dread, dispair and or fear.
Goltizuru
Love this book & the writer! Book was in good shape
Kefym
good, but plot should be refined
Kazijora
A noir masterpiece by Cornell Woolrich. A devoted wife tries to prove her husband innocent of murder. Woolich takes his heroine on a tour of the dark side of New York.
NI_Rak
It would be easy to make the case that of the ten greatest writers of the twentieth century, at least three of them came from the pulps: Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, and Cornell Woolrich. And of those three, it is just as easy to make the case that Woolrich was the finest among that daunting trio. Yes, Hammett was Hemingway before Hemingway was Hemingway, but he could not sustain it, so his output is meager. Chandler’s influence on the evolution of the detective in fiction, and the quality of his prose, is staggering, some of his work, brilliant. Yet here again, that literary brilliance had an undeniable shelf life. His output and resume was greater than Hammett’s, yet does not come close to Woolrich. Output is not quality, of course, but as Ray Bradbury noted, it produces quality, and Woolrich was prolific. What cinches it is a stretch where Woolrich published novel after novel of gripping, enduring suspense. His use of the language was extraordinary, his ability to cast a mood magical, and his mastery of creating heart-pounding suspense remains unequaled.

One of the great writers of the twentieth century, the man who practically invented the darkened noir streets of fiction and perfected that smothering feeling of fate having us in its grasp, isn’t as well remembered today as contemporaries such as Hammett and Chandler, Gardner and Cain. Perhaps it is because even through the darkness, there was a romanticism to Woolrich’s best works. You had a sense that he wanted things to turn out alright, but fate was against him as a writer, just as it was the protagonist. His novels of mystery and suspense in the 1940s, classics such as Black Alibi, The Bride Wore Black, Phantom Lady, Rendezvous in Black, Deadline at Dawn, The Black Angel, The Black Curtain, The Black Path of Fear, and The Night Has a Thousand Eyes, make up a canon of excellence which dwarfs the aforementioned names.

The Black Angel is a terrific example of Woolrich suspense. This is noir at its quintessential best. But there exists within the story, something darkly romantic, intoxicating even. Beginning to read this story is like swallowing that first shot of whiskey, and soon we are in what Raymond Chandler called Woolrich’s work, a fever dream. In a sense we are on a pub crawl as the protagonist goes from one name on her list to the next in order to clear the man she loves of murder. Below are a few minor spoilers —

The premise is that a woman named Alberta who loves her husband very much discovers he has strayed. While crushed, she is certain her husband loves her as well — he calls her Angel Face when they are alone — and has simply fallen for a predatory woman. There is a sense that she is smarter, and recognizes what the woman is, whereas her husband cannot. Going to the woman’s apartment, she discovers she’s been murdered. Fearful he will be blamed for her murder, she removes a book with his name in it so the police won’t find it.

This makes perfect sense because of the psychology Woolrich gives the reader through Alberta’s first-person narrative. This has all happened over a very short period of time, and because the husband calls the woman to speak with her while Alberta is actually inside the dead woman’s apartment, it is clear he has not committed the murder. He is arrested despite Alberta’s best efforts, and the two have a very moving conversation through a fence in which he is not only remorseful, but convinces Alberta, and the reader, that he had already chosen Alberta, and was breaking things off. This of course, adds to the criminal case against him, but for the reader, and Alberta, it sets up the largest portion of Black Angel, which is a suspenseful search through the names in the book for the real killer. As with many a Woolrich story, time is of the essence, as the chair awaits Kirk unless Alberta can find Mia’s killer. Emboldened by her husband’s choice, knowing they might just have a chance to put this behind them if she can get him out of this jam, she will take great risks, making for great suspense. But something happens which she hadn’t counted on, and it will haunt both Alberta and the reader at the exciting ending. No more can be revealed without spoiling this terrific novel of suspense.

In 1946 this book, as was the case with many a Woolrich tale, was adapted both for radio’s Suspense program, and a classic Hollywood film. For those who would like to listen to the radio adaptation, there is a link on you tube which someone has placed for it, as well as the film adaptation starring June Vincent, Dan Duryea, and Peter Lorre. I highly suggest reading the book first, however, as it will increase your enjoyment of either the radio adaptation or the great film. A true masperiece of noir and suspense, but not for everyone.
hardy
Cornell Woolrich was one of the most accomplished noir writers of the century and is often ranked just behind Hammett, Chandler, and Gardner. He also wrote under the pen names William Irish and George Hopley. Dozens of films were adapted from his books, including Black Angel, Fear in the Night, Rear Window, The Bride Wore Black, and Original Sin. His work is dark and brooding and often features a protagonist who has sinned and cannot ever get his or her hands clean. His best known novels include The Bride Wore Black, Black Alibi, and Waltz Into Darkness.

This is a very unusual book and not everyone is going to like it. At its best, there is a dreamlike quality to the world that Woolrich creates and one doesn't even realize until far along that it takes place in NYC in the mid twentieth century. Woolrich was a master at taking the reader inside the character's thoughts and the first person narration can be fairly intense and suspenseful.

Plot-wise, here is a young innocent wife, Alberta Murray, who to her shock and dismay, finds clues that her husband has been unfaithful. The first scene where she puts it together is fantastic. She begins by talking about his endearments, calling her "Angel Face." "And things like that your husband says to you." She muses that it has suddenly stopped and she didn't know why. She notices his blue suit is missing, but it's her job to take things to the cleaners. But it wasn't just the suits. "There had already been one or two little things before this. And that made it something else again." And there were the little lies and other things.

Alberta figures out who the mistress is and finds a photo of her in the paper. And, now, dear reader, you start to wonder if Alberta was telling the truth or if she went right off the rails when she found out her husband was having an affair.

Alberta goes to confront Mia, to have it out with her. Alberta has a few drinks, dresses up in her finest to make an impression, and when she closes her door, for the first time in a long time, doesn't give a damn what's for supper. She's going to look her enemy in the eye. She's going to war and she's going to get her dear husband back.

Once there, Alberta tells the reader that there was no answer, that the door was unlocked, that she wandered in and surveyed her enemy's lair, and cautiously trespassed only to find that someone had smothered Mia to death.

Alberta then does what any woman would do in such circumstances. She protects her husband who is now truly hers what with the competition out of the way. She removes any clue to her husband's connection to Mia, including the address book.

What then follows is the heart of the book when her husband is arrested and tried for the murder. Alberta has to free him. She figures out that someone with the initial M did it and proceeds to investigate the M's in Mia's address book.

After all, someone has to take Kirk's place in prison. Her investigation technique is nutty at best and cuckoo at worst. She goes and meets the M men from the address book, pretending to be a friend of Mia's. This leads her to bars in the Bowery, to drug addicts elsewhere in the city, to a blind date, and to an affair with the city's leading gangster.

How she expects to solve the crime is a mystery as she engages in these mini- episodes that are terrifying to her. Or she just gone completely nuts?

All in all, a remarkable book that is of a different world than most noir novels.
Darkraven
A man is arrested for murdering his mistress. His wife knows he didn't do it but how can she prove it? Through some peculiar circumstances she discovers the names and phone numbers of four different men who might have done it. She sets out to meet each of them and find out if they killed the woman. This leads her into prostitution, drugs and murder.

The premise is good even if the woman's finding the men's names is questionable--but then most Woolrich novels have some highly unlikely circumstances and laughable leaps of logic. If you're a fan of his (like me) you just accept them. Woolrich writes so beautifully it doesn't bother me that the stories don't make a lot of sense. This is not his best effort (that's got to be "I Married A Dead Man") but it's very good, moves quickly and has a surprise ending you won't see coming. Definetely worth reading and it's short--this edition is only 238 pages.
The Black Angel ebook
Author:
Cornell Woolrich
Category:
Mystery
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1149 kb
FB2 size:
1345 kb
DJVU size:
1564 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Ballantine Books (September 12, 1982)
Rating:
4.5
Other formats:
lrf lit doc azw
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