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The Singing Sands ebook

by Josephine Tey


It was six o'clock of a March morning, and still dark. The beasts that talk, The streams that stand, The stones that walk, The singing sand, That guard the way To Paradise

It was six o'clock of a March morning, and still dark. The beasts that talk, The streams that stand, The stones that walk, The singing sand, That guard the way To Paradise. Well, it was odd enough, in all conscience.

THE SINGING SANDS by JOSEPHINE TEY 1 It was six o’clock of a March morning, and still dark. Into the glow of the signal cabin and out again. Under the solitary emerald among the rubies on the signal bridge. On towards the empty grey waste of platform that waited under the arcs. The London mail at the end of its jo.

MacKintosh's best-known books were written under the name of Josephine Tey, which was the name of her Suffolk great-great grandmother. Her last work, a further crime novel, The Singing Sands, was found in her papers and published posthumously. In five of the mystery novels, all of which except the first she wrote under the name of Tey, the hero is Scotland Yard Inspector Alan Grant. Grant appears in a sixth, The Franchise Affair, as a minor character. Tey was intensely private, shunning all publicity throughout her life. During her last year, when she knew that she was mortally ill, she resolutely avoided all her friends as well. The London mail at the end of its journey

Josephine Tey wrote only a handful of mystery novels.

Josephine Tey wrote only a handful of mystery novels. I recommend the entire Tey series of books featuring Alan Grant. They are not "fair play" mystery novels, but they are "tea cosy" mysteries - no blood, guts and gore - and evoke the time period and are a lot of fun.

Josephine Tey. The Singing Sands. Publication date: 1952. On his train journey back to Scotland for a well-earned rest, Inspector Grant learns that a fellow passenger, one Charles Martin, has been found dead. It looks like a case of misadventure - but Grant is not so sure. Teased by some enigmatic lines of verse that the deceased had apparently scrawled on a newspaper, he follows a trail to the Outer Hebrides

Tey, Josephine - The Singing Sands. Josephine Tey - - the Singing Sands.

Tey, Josephine - The Singing Sands. Скачать (htm, 669 Kb).

On sick leave from Scotland Yard, Inspector Alan Grant is planning a quiet holiday with an old school chum to recover from overwork and mental fatigue. Teased by some enigmatic lines of verse that the deceased had apparently scrawled on a newspaper, he follows a trail to the Outer Hebrides

In the last of Tey's Inspector Grant mysteries, her sleuth investigates a death made suspicious by a few enigmatic lines, apparently scribbled by the deceased before his demise. Grant's enquiries take him to the remote Hebrides, where the bizarre circumstances of the death begin to become clear.
Hulbine
Josephine Tey brings to the table superior plot, well developed characters and mysteries that do not disappoint.

Her Inspector Grant mysteries feature a detective so dedicated that he investigates no matter what his circumstances. In this volume the inspector is haunted by a young man found dead on his train while he is on leave. He has taken time to recover from stress related symptoms as a result of his work with Scotland Yard. Even while suffering from claustrophobia and depression his subconscious is classifying tiny aspects of the scene he witnessed. Is he just obsessive, or has someone produced an almost perfect murder? In true Grant fashion he continues to work the problem even while fishing and visiting close friends.

A charming widow, fishing and a death that may or may not be a murder. A cure for malaise tailor made for the likable Inspector Grant. Another example of Tey's superior craftsmanship.
Duzshura
It is not necessary to have read the other Inspector Grant mysteries to enjoy this ultimate one, but the pace and tone to this one is more leisurely and personal, and it helps if you have a love or interest in Scotland. The actual murder is presented first in the novel, occurring on the train Grant is riding north on, during an enforced vacation caused by 'nerves' and insomnia. Grant cannot keep from puzzling over the circumstances, even as the death is attributed to natural causes. He mulls it over as he engages with local family, fishing spots, a storm in a very inhospitable island hop, and finally, fit again, brings it to a satisfying conclusion. This title is a close second to the author' Daughter of Time, the mystery placed high on the 'Best' list for all time. Enjoy.
LadyShlak
Josephine Tey wrote only a handful of mystery novels. The first I ever read was The Daughter of Time, in which a modern day (or rather, 1950s) detective researches the case of Richard III. (And I'd learned about that book from The Murders of Richard III by Elizabeth Peters, my absolute favorite book of Peters). I recommend the entire Tey series of books featuring Alan Grant. They are not "fair play" mystery novels, but they are "tea cosy" mysteries - no blood, guts and gore - and evoke the time period and are a lot of fun.
Risky Strong Dromedary
Oh sure, there's a mystery at the heart of "The Singing Sands" and a suspect eventually appears. But there's so much more in a JosephineTey novel that the mystery is almost incidental. There's her troubled protagonist, Inspector Grant; a small cast of well-drawn supporting characters (none of whom ever committed a murder); powerful evocations of places real and imagined; and most significantly, her delicious prose. Tey's novels, I'm certain, will be rediscovered again and again by future generations.
Arcanefire
Anything that Josephine Tey wrote is well worth reading. You can find a description of the plot in several places, so I won't go over that again, but I highly recommend her books if you are at all interested in classic mystery novels. She was one of the best.
DireRaven
I love mysteries from the golden age (this one is from the early 1950s) and I've enjoyed the other Josephine Tey mysteries I've read.

This one, the last of her Scotland Yard Inspector Alan Grant mysteries, was just ok for me and did not hold my interest as well as the others I've read.

In this one, Grant, on sick leave to recover from overwork and stress, travels to Scotland to stay with old friends and go fishing etc. to relax and clear his head. On the train, he stumbles on a dead man, finding a cryptic poem handwritten on a newspaper that includes a line about "the singing sands."

A casual inquiry such as this is just the tonic for Grant.

Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed it but I'd call it only good, not great.
funike
A wonderful, unusual story. Some people are born to question and they make the best detectives. Inspector Alan Grant of Scotland Yard is one. He mentions that true criminals are extremely vain. Good character development. The story is interesting right from the start. Kept me reading into the night.
Josephine Tey is one of the great mystery writers of the twentieth century. Any one of her books is well worth reading, and I've read several. This one will keep your interest and in suspense to the very end. Brilliant.
The Singing Sands ebook
Author:
Josephine Tey
Category:
Mystery
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1355 kb
FB2 size:
1367 kb
DJVU size:
1708 kb
Language:
Publisher:
William Heinemann Ltd; First Edition edition (December 1952)
Pages:
258 pages
Rating:
4.6
Other formats:
azw lit lit mobi
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