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Winterwood: A Novel ebook

by Patrick McCabe


First published in Great Britain 2006.

Winterwood: A Novel by Patrick McCabe, was indeed a tangled web of utter weirdness, of the Irish variety. In Patrick McCabe's spellbinding new novel, nothing-and no one-are ever quite what they seem. As a standing fact, I enjoy very weird, disturbing, psychological thrillers and the Irish. So it stands to reason this book would be right up my alley of weirdness. When Hatch, devoted husband and father, revisits the secluded mountains where he grew up, he meets Auld Pappie Ned.

Patrick McCabe (born 27 March 1955) is an Irish writer. Known for his mostly dark and violent novels set in contemporary-often small-town-Ireland, McCabe has been twice shortlisted for the Booker Prize, for The Butcher Boy and Breakfast on Pluto, both of which have been made into films. McCabe was born in Clones, County Monaghan. He resides in Clones with his wife artist Margot Quinn and two daughters, Katie and Ellen.

Shortlisted for the Irish Book Award for Novel of the Year, Winterwood is a disturbing tale of love, death, and identity from a masterful novelist whose "books are skillful exercises in the macabre and the horrific.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Shortlisted for the Irish Book Award for Novel of the Year, Winterwood is a disturbing tale of love, death, and identity from a masterful novelist whose "books are skillful exercises in the macabre and the horrific. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

In this chilling and unforgettable novel, Patrick McCabe shows us that nothing-and no one-is ever quite what they seem. The San Francisco Chronicle declared him "one of the most brilliant writers to ever come out of Ireland," and Neil Jordan called Winterwood "the most terrifying book I've ever read. In this chilling and unforgettable novel, Patrick McCabe shows us that nothing-and no one-is ever quite what they seem.

Winterwood : a novel. New York, NY : Bloomsbury Pub. : Distributed to the trade by Holtzbrinck Publishers. 2006, Winterwood : a novel, Patrick McCabe Bloomsbury Pub. McCabe, Pat. Winterwood : a novel, Patrick McCabe Bloomsbury Pub. : Distributed to the trade by Holtzbrinck Publishers New York, NY 2006. {Citation title Winterwood : a novel, Patrick McCabe author1 McCabe, Pat, 1955- year 2006 publisher Bloomsbury Pub.

The San Francisco Chronicle declared him "one of the most brilliant writers to ever come out of Ireland," and. What is Kobo Super Points? A loyalty program that rewards you for your love of reading. Explore rewards Explore Kobo VIP Membership.

Patrick McCabe's Winterwood is a disturbing but brilliant evocation of modern rural Ireland, says Irvine Welsh. His new novel, Winterwood, a sustained achievement of often dazzling brilliance, examines the old versus new Ireland conflict. This has been successfully attempted before, not least by McCabe himself, but arguably never pulled off with such enlightenment and finesse as within these pages. The protagonist of the book is Redmond Hatch, a shape-shifting monster who, like most of them, is all too human.

Winterwood : a novel. Winterwood : a novel. by. McCabe, Pat, 1955-. Social change, Mountain life, Life change events, Storytellers.

In Patrick McCabe's spellbinding new novel, nothing-and no one-are ever quite what they seem. While he claims to be just a harmless local fiddler, a teller of tall tales, Ned sets off a cataclysmic chain of events in Redmond's life. From the mysterious disappearance of Redmond's daughter to the reluctant remembrance of a troubled boyhood to secret glimpses into an unstable marriage, everything soon spirals out of control.

Once, Redmond Hatch was in heaven, married to the lovely Catherine and father to enchanting daughter Immy. But then he took them both to Winterwood. And it would never be the same again…

In Patrick McCabe's spellbinding new novel, nothing―and no one―are ever quite what they seem. When Hatch, devoted husband and father, revisits the secluded mountains where he grew up, he meets Auld Pappie Ned. While he claims to be just a harmless local fiddler, a teller of tall tales, Ned sets off a cataclysmic chain of events in Redmond's life. From the mysterious disappearance of Redmond's daughter to the reluctant remembrance of a troubled boyhood to secret glimpses into an unstable marriage, everything soon spirals out of control. Narrated with hypnotic precision and fractured lyricism, Winterwood is a disturbing and unforgettable tale of love, death and identity from a masterful novelist.

Nuadazius
This book had so many "big" words it was hard to understand then when I thought I had the concept down I looked forward to the ending which made no sense... it wasn't what I hoped it would be ...
definitely a waste of my time
Kirimath
I appreciate the deliberate lack of commercial appeal in this book and although not as dense and hammering as Patrick White's efforts, it's in the ballpark. This writer wants to repel readers and works extra hard to do so. He's mighty successful at putting a reader at multiple arms' lengths, and despite the distance, the vignettes are often effective and uncomfortably intimate.

The weakness is in the point of the thing -- shocking? No, quite stock in that effort. Psychotic? Also no. You kind of know what's going on here and what will transpire within the first fifty pages—no new ground broken. I wish the writer were smart enough to fulfill the promise of some of the prose, which is artfully spartan and beautifully poetic. The disjointed nature of the narrative is a bit of a marvel, but it succeeds in distracting rather than adding to the experience. Whenever I realize I'm congratulating myself as an attentive reader for sticking with something and taking the effort to understand the maze of an author's efforts, I immediately wish I were just reading Jane Eyre again. The book is a worthwhile experience for a broad reader, but only if you have a few hours to kill.
skriper
Novelist Patrick McCabe (The Butcher Boy; Breakfast on Pluto) examines the social and political arc of the past twenty-five years in Ireland as a parallel to the shifting fortunes and inexorable decline of his protagonist in Winterwood. The protagonist/narrator's attempts to leap into the competitive modern world exemplify the efforts of his country to do the same. At this and at a more personal level Winterwood is about the difficulty of extricating oneself from the ghosts of the past, and the pernicious nature of deeply imprinted, horrific childhood experiences.

When journalist Redmond Hatch returns to his former home in the rural town of Slievenageeha to write a colorful article about the folk traditions there, he meets a native named Ned Strange and immediately falls under his spell. Strange is a local favorite, with his country dialect, fanciful anecdotes and old Irish songs. His quaintness buys his way into the company of people who see him as a relic, a human time capsule conveniently preserving the history that they view as a novelty. But Redmond sees a different side of Ned when they are alone together, drinking. Ned reveals his belligerence, rage and cruelty--and a good deal of knowledge about Redmond's family life before he left Slievenageeha. Ned is one of several characters who impose themselves, physically and psychically, on children. Throughout the book Ned functions as a catalyst, a plausible character, a composite, a phantom, and a cipher. That McCabe is able to make all of this work indicates the virtuosity of his prose.

Redmond is a man who dearly wants to believe the things he tells us about himself. Like Ned, he has adopted a face that will allow him into polite company while keeping secret the nature he knows he cannot share. To speak the whole truth would tear him apart, and so he denies what he knows and keeps up the relentless patter of our age: the over-energized pep talk and TV-trained self-analysis that pass for conversation in the 21st century. He is a man who must pretend to be ever on the verge of turning over a new leaf. As he persists in his struggle to overcome what is insurmountable, he tries to convince us, and himself, that everything is fine, or nearly fine, or about to be fine.

This masterful study of a damaged mind fragmenting beyond repair comes from one of our most respected contemporary authors. Complex in tone and point of view, the book is both a social chronicle and a record of personal catastrophe.

McCabe takes the quaint veneer of a misrepresented and sentimentalized way of life and shows how nostalgia itself can mask and thereby allow a persistent evil. Redmond refuses to relinquish his gruesome optimism, and it gradually engulfs him. Mocked because of his background and family, he realizes that this is a repudiation of his deepest nature, but cannot offer an articulate, non-violent response. His wife calls his relatives hillbillies, and he laughs along with her, secretly mortified by the pathetic and brutal details of his impoverished youth. His tragedy, if we allow him so grand a conceit, is to be caught between what is expected of him in the world where he tries to live, and what has happened to him in the world he has tried to leave behind.
Nalmetus
It seems this book is one of those that really runs the whole gamut of opinions from great to bad and everything in between. For me I really enjoyed it. I would not portray it as scary or chilling. More like a gruesome trip into the macabre and disturbing world that is the mind of Redmond Hatch the books main character. His world falls apart and descends into a series of nightmares and hallucinations after his wife leaves him and takes their daughter with her.
Winterwood: A Novel ebook
Author:
Patrick McCabe
Category:
Thrillers & Suspense
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1276 kb
FB2 size:
1209 kb
DJVU size:
1252 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA; 1 edition (January 23, 2007)
Pages:
240 pages
Rating:
4.3
Other formats:
mbr doc docx rtf
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