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Software Ecosystem: Understanding an Indispensable Technology and Industry (MIT Press) ebook

by Clemens Szyperski,David G. Messerschmitt


Software Ecosystem is an encyclopedic and cutting-edge book

Software Ecosystem is an encyclopedic and cutting-edge book. Bridging the technological and business spheres, it will be a terrific resource for anyone working in or studying the software industry. Richard N. Langlois, Department of Economics, University of Connecticut). Marketers, programmers, consultants, and lawyers all participate in the software ecosystem.

In Software Ecosystem, Messerschmitt and Szyperski address the overlapping and . By David G. Messerschmitt and Clemens Szyperski.

In Software Ecosystem, Messerschmitt and Szyperski address the overlapping and related perspectives of technologists and non-technologists. MIT Press began publishing journals in 1970 with the first volumes of Linguistic Inquiry and the Journal of Interdisciplinary History. Today we publish over 30 titles in the arts and humanities, social sciences, and science and technology.

Software Ecosystem is a book written by David G. Messerschmitt and Clemens Szyperski that explains the essence and effects of a "software ecosystem".

These relationships are frequently underpinned by a common technological platform and operate through the exchange of information, resources, and artifacts.

In Software Ecosystem, Messerschmitt and Szyperski address the overlapping and related perspectives of technologists and nontechnologists

In Software Ecosystem, Messerschmitt and Szyperski address the overlapping and related perspectives of technologists and nontechnologists.

David G. Messerschmitt. The MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts London, England. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means (including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval) without permission in writing from the publisher. This book was set in Sabon by SNP Best-set Typesetter Lt. Hong Kong.

In Software Ecosystem, Messerschmitt and Szyperski address the overlapping and related .

In Software Ecosystem, Messerschmitt and Szyperski address the overlapping and related perspectives of technologists and nontechnologists. oceedings{twareEU, title {Software Ecosystem: Understanding an Indispensable Technology and Industry}, author {David G. Messerschmitt and Clemens A. Szyperski}, year {2003} }. David G. Messerschmitt, Clemens A. Szyperski. Software has gone from obscurity to indispensability in less than fifty years. Although other industries have followed a similar trajectory, software and its supporting industry are different.

ABSTRACT: The software industry has evolved to a multiple-product development created on a platform and based on a common architecture integrated to other systems. This integration happens through components and third-party developers networks in Software Ecosystems (SECOs). Since systems and software development processes present challenges beyond the technical side, SECOs have emerged as an approach to improve the Software Engineering (SE) mindset in the industry.

Software ecosystem: Understanding an indispensable technology and industry. DG Messerschmitt, C Szyperski. The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2003. Component technology-what, where, and how? C Szyperski. 25th International Conference on Software Engineering, 2003.

Software Ecosystem book. Start by marking Software Ecosystem: Understanding an Indispensable Technology and Industry as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Software has gone from obscurity to indispensability in less than fifty years. Although other industries have followed a similar trajectory, software and its supporting industry are different. In this book the authors explain, from a variety of perspectives, how software and the software industry are different―technologically, organizationally, and socially.

The growing importance of software requires professionals in all fields to deal with both its technical and social aspects; therefore, users and producers of software need a common vocabulary to discuss software issues. In Software Ecosystem, Messerschmitt and Szyperski address the overlapping and related perspectives of technologists and non-technologists. After an introductory chapter on technology, the book is organized around six points of view: users, and what they need software to accomplish for them; software engineers and developers, who translate the user's needs into program code; managers, who must orchestrate the resources, material and human, to operate the software; industrialists, who organize companies to produce and distribute software; policy experts and lawyers, who must resolve conflicts inside and outside the industry without discouraging growth and innovation; and economists, who offer insights into how the software market works. Each chapter considers not only the issues most relevant to that perspective but also relates those issues to the other perspectives as well. Non-technologists will appreciate the context in which technology is discussed; technical professionals will gain more understanding of the social issues that should be considered in order to make software more useful and successful.

Dddasuk
Messerschmitt and Szyperski have collaborated on a unique book, that provides a snapshot of the software industry from many different vantage points at a time of rapid change in both technology (components and objected oriented programming) and business models (Internet as a channel). The different vantage points they use suggest a number of trends that the software industry will follow over the next decade that are far different from that in the popular trade press or business press. They highlight why software is different intrinsically from an economics vantage point: the first release of a software product can cost significant time and money, yet further copies take relatively little to no time or money to generate; the more copies of software in use, the more valuable the software can become; experience has shown that as the number of people increases to get software product releases done, it can take more time, not less, to finish the work. This book will be like a fine wine: as it ages, it should get better.
Hugifyn
At the *intersection* of software and business, and the business of software. The authors draw on research in economics, IT, and strategy and bring them together to draw excellent insights at their intersection. The book is not really about business or software per se.

Depending on your background, you might want to skip entire sections that are right up your own alley. If you are a manager looking to REALLY understand how the architecture of IT systems (e.g., at the enterprise level) interacts with business strategy, this book will provide a good exposure. If you are a propellerhead or uber-geek wanting to understand more about how your work shapes, hinders, or facilitates business strategy, this book is just right. I keep up with new research developments in the business of software and feel comfortable saying that the insights in this book are not to be found in other books that exist on the market.

The book is very well written, but be forewarned, it is deep. Fully appreciating it requires thought, reflection on what the authors are saying, and a tempered pace. It is not a quick read and not a "how-to" book. My only quibble with this book has nothing to do with its content: Once you get rid of the dust jacket, the quality of its binding and cover printing is absolutely shoddy. Very highly recommended and worth every penny of the forty dollar price.

Three year (June 2008) update on my 2005 review: Nothing yet comes close to the wide array of thought provoking questions that this book raises. I'm wildly speculating here, but the fact that one of the coauthors is an electrical engineer rather than a software developer is perhaps the reason why the nature of this book is so refreshing and original. Sometimes, it takes an outsider without the baggage of insider assumptions to bring a fresh perspective. At the new paperback price, it's better than a red-tagged bargain that you'd find at the aisle end caps of Target!
Lost Python
I'm a university student who purchased this book to get a little more insight into how software works / is designed / is integrated into IT. Based on other reviews, I felt this book would do the trick, and would be engaging.

However... this book only describes software in the most rudimentary way. It is essentially a big glossary of basic terms and principles and never probes the dynamics of the relationship between software and the designer, and software and the user.

Furthermore, it is a tedious read. It discusses software with the monotony of my most hated accounting texts.

Bottom-line, if you want the facts and just the facts, buy this book. If you truly want to understand how software is created, the role it plays in our lives, and its potential, keep looking.
Goll
The authors write with uncommon clarity about an industry known for its complexity. Even experienced software developers can get lost in the shifting tides of technology change that periodically sweep the software industry. This book provides a way to get above the waves, and see the whole ocean.

(...)

The authors elegantly write about the interdependency of technology infrastructure and applications. Their presentation of the "chicken-and-egg conundrum" was a little depressing. I had hoped my great "CycleFree Software" invention would revolutionize software infrastructure, but after reading this book I have decided to take up writing plays for children!
Fenius
Varian - Shapiro "Information rules" made it worldwide. Now comes - actually from UC Berkely again - a systematic work about the things many people believe to understand.
Software creation is here seen in context of industry, govrnement and economy - not only business, not merely science.
Excellent reading to get the correct ideas behind the buzzwords. Very good for people, who already got the hunch of important changes happening from Castells (Network Society).
Software Ecosystem: Understanding an Indispensable Technology and Industry (MIT Press) ebook
Author:
Clemens Szyperski,David G. Messerschmitt
Category:
Programming
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1206 kb
FB2 size:
1865 kb
DJVU size:
1372 kb
Language:
Publisher:
The MIT Press (August 1, 2003)
Pages:
432 pages
Rating:
4.8
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