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Writing Excel Macros: Automating Excel to Work for You ebook

by PhD Steven Roman


I have read several of Steven Roman's books. I was excited to see this book because I do a lot of macro programming in Excel

I have read several of Steven Roman's books. He knows the subject well, and his information about the VBA development environment is very good, even if it is repeated in several of his VBA and macro books. The information on creating custom toolbars and menus is the clearest that I have seen. I was excited to see this book because I do a lot of macro programming in Excel. I am not a programmer by any stretch of the imagination but I do know lower level programming quite well. I'm sorry to say that this book is a big dissapointment.

Steven Roman is Professor Emeritus of mathematics at the California State University, Fullerton. He has taught at a number of other universities, including MIT, the University of California at Santa Barbara, and the University of South Florida. Dr. Roman received his . degree from the University of California at Los Angeles and his P. from the University of Washington. Roman has authored 32 books, including a number of books on mathematics, such as Coding and Information Theory, Advanced Linear Algebra, and Field Theory, published by Springer-Verlag.

Writing Excel macros. Developing macros to automate and customize Excel"-Cover. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by booksale-cataloger3 on September 27, 2011.

Excel features a complete, state-of-the-art integrated development environment for writing, running, testing, and debugging VBA macros. is a professor emeritus of mathematics at the California State University, Fullerton.

Organization of This Book Writing Excel Macros consists of 21 chapters that can informally be divided into four parts . behavior (that is, it works differently on different systems or at different times).

Organization of This Book Writing Excel Macros consists of 21 chapters that can informally be divided into four parts (excluding the introductory chapter). In addition, there are five appendixes. Chapter 1 examines why you might want to learn programming and provides a few examples of the kinds of problems that can best be solved through programming. Indeed, there have been occasions when one of us did not get the same results as the others with the same code and the same data. Moreover, I have personally had trouble on occasion duplicating my own results after a significant span of time!

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Writing Excel Macros offers a solid introduction to writing VBA macros and programs in Excel and shows you how to get more power out of Excel at the programming level.

Find all the study resources for Writing Excel Macros with Vba by Steven Roman. Writing Excel Macros with Vba. Followers.

Поставляется из: Англии Описание: Updated for Excel 2002, this text offers Excel power-users, as well as programmers who are unfamiliar with the Excel object model, with an introduction to writing Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) macros and programs for Excel. Описание: Master the programming features in Excel 2002 and unleash the power of VBA (VIsual Basic for Applications).

Microsoft Excel is an enormously powerful and flexible application. Yet despite its powerful feature set, there is a great deal that Excel either does not allow you to do or does not allow you to do easily through its user interface. And in spite of Excel's reputation as the most widely used spreadsheet application, the majority of its users do not venture beyond the basics of creating spreadsheets and perhaps dabbling with macros. Consequently, these users aren't getting all the power out of this formidable application.With Writing Excel Macros you will learn there are many things you can do at the programming level that you cannot do at the user-interface level, that is, with the menus and dialog boxes of Excel. And learning how to get more power out of Excel will mean you can be more effective in your work.Writing Excel Macros offers a solid introduction to writing VBA macros and programs and provides Excel users and programmers unfamiliar with the Excel object model with an excellent overview to writing VBA macros and programs. The essentials of the VBA language and the Excel object model are covered so that, when you have finished the book, you will know enough about Excel VBA to begin creating effective working programs.In particular, the book focuses on:

Programming languages. Brief overview of programming and programming languages, as well as information on Variables, Data Types, and Constants, Functions and Subroutines, and more.The Visual Basic Editor. Before tackling the basics of the programming language that Excel uses, the reader is acquainted with the VBA environment--the Visual Basic Editor.Handling your code. An overview of where to store your code and how to activate it from an Excel spreadsheet.The Excel object model. An in-depth overview of the Excel object model, including the Application, Workbook, Worksheet, and Range objects.Appendices. Details on the Shape object; getting the Installed Printers; Command Bar Controls and Face IDs; programming Excel from another application; and more.The information in this book is written in a succinct, practical manner that is characteristic of Steve Roman's straightforward approach. Readers will find useful examples throughout the book that deal with specific programming problems and allow them to gain hands-on experience in the VBA environment. Whether your interest in Excel programming is so you can be more effective in your work, or you want to learn how to write Excel programs for others to use, this book offers a solid introduction to writing VBA macros and programs and shows you how to get more power out of Excel at the programming level.
Faell
This book is not aimed at absolute beginners, although it pretends to be (it contains short descriptions of other languages, and devotes some time to elementary concepts). It will be appreciated by readers with some minimal programming experience, like all O'Reilly books. For novices, I'd suggest the readable "Excel 2000 for Dummies" by G.Harvey. In brief, the book's virtues are clarity and brevity. 500 pages is below average for a sector full of bloated manuals. These two virtues alone justify the 4 stars of my rating.
The shortcomings are the incompleteness of the treatment. Structures and objects are not really introduced, but you can't have it all in a slim book, and the author in the firy first pages warns the reader that this is a book for average-complexity macros. There are (minor) typos here and there, and in each chapter the author shamelessly promotes other publications and software tools written by him. A more impartial bibliography would have been appreciated. Yet, in my opinion these are minor flaws.
Personally, I would have liked an even more synthetic style in exchange for a more comprehensive treatment. In any event, O'Reilly offers a VBA "nutshell" book that is supposed to be good. The author has also written a book on Object-Oriented-Programming in VBA, edited by Springer-Verlag.
In synthesis, whatever topic the author chooses to cover in the book, he does cover it very well. But some essential aspects of VBA are missing, and they could have been added with little effort. Still, the book is reasonably priced, well written and well edited. Overall, a good buy.
The Sinners from Mitar
Pretty basic stuff but it was OK. I really was looking for the the other book that I ordered (Writing Excel Macros with VBA).
Bu
I have read several of Steven Roman's books. He knows the subject well, and his information about the VBA development environment is very good, even if it is repeated in several of his VBA and macro books. The information on creating custom toolbars and menus is the clearest that I have seen. He also gives a complete list of all the internal menus, toolbar buttons and icons available in Excel.
On the downside - Mr. Roman is terrible at presenting useful examples. In this book he has a complex example that runs through the text. I prefer that each topic has its own examples. I do not want to build an example application by reading and working through chapters that I am not very interested in, just to be able to work with the examples in the sections I am interested in. The author even mentions that he would normally present the book's material in a different sequence, but that would not follow what is needed for his example.
Other books by Mr. Roman also have these complex examples. He is a professor of mathematics and he uses a Turing engine in his Visual Basic Objects book. A lot of programmers, and would-be programmers, do not have an extensive math background. A more common and mundane example would have been preferable.
Vetitc
I'm adding to my review of 2 years ago because I'm amazed that even though I'm now using XP with Microsoft Office 2002, this book is still useful. Although some of the actual code is unusable (and was unusable with 97), it still points me in the right direction. I can't believe I still find information in here that can't be found in other VBA & Excel programming reference books. I have so many of them, and I always find that this book keeps me on the right track where others drop off. It's definitely true that one must keep several Excel & VBA books on hand because they all have incorrect info here and there, and no one volume covers everything. But while I will probably be letting go of a few others now that my firm has (finally) upgraded, this is one I'm gonna keep.
krot
O'Reilly books don't waste your time holding your hand through the wizards like most other books do. (The purpose of a wizard is to hold your hand through the process. Who needs a book to hold your hand too?) "Writing Excel Macros" is an excellent reference book. It's great when, at the back of you mind, you know the property or method that you need, but you can't quite put your finger on it. With this book, you can put your finger on it. If you're looking for screen shots get another book. If you're trying to find a good computer book on a subject, check for an O'Reilly book first.
Another great thing about O'Reilly books is that they look great on the book shelf. My book shelf proudly displays many of the O'Reilly books. Even the books are color matched to the subjects to which they pertain (ie. Green books are for web books, blue books for applications, etc.)
And, finally, "No. I do not work for O'Reilly"
Dukinos
This book is definitely not for beginners and not a good reference to the VBA Basic language or the Excel objects.
The author introduces well the operation of the Excel Visual Basic Editor along with a brief and quite incomplete introduction of the Basic language. A good VBA Basic book is recommended as another side reference. The Excel object models, which are extensive, powerful, and vague, are discussed very well with a lot of examples. Unfortunately, the index at the back of the book lacks considerably such that I was forced to search relevant items by thumbing through the book. The Excel objects are learned mostly from the examples and the use of Excel macro recording facilities. A more thorough and detailed tree structure of the objects would help a lot; instead the author prefers to offer his $79.95 Object Browser software. . The author does share many insights into his experience with Excel objects and offers recommendations to avoid pitfalls. The explanation of the creation of custom menus is quite difficult to understand, however the author does offer sufficient example code to learn it. Recommended for intermediate and advanced programmers. The alternative is Weber's book, which is not better and is more expensive.
Writing Excel Macros: Automating Excel to Work for You ebook
Author:
PhD Steven Roman
Category:
Software
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1769 kb
FB2 size:
1671 kb
DJVU size:
1536 kb
Language:
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (May 11, 1999)
Pages:
554 pages
Rating:
4.6
Other formats:
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