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Master of Deceit: J. Edgar Hoover and America in the Age of Lies ebook

by Luke Daniels,Marc Aronson


Marc Aronson has a doctorate in American history and is a member of the graduate faculty in the library school at Rutgers.

Marc Aronson lives in New Jersey. As I rooted for those few who took on J. Edgar Hoover with right and might; I cried for the many like the Rosenbergs, the Scottsboro Boys and Martin Luther King. Illustrated and Includes bibliographical references (p. 198-219) and index.

Master of Deceit book. Here is a book about the twentieth century that blazes with questions and insights about our choices in the twenty-first.

Master of Deceit: J. Edgar Hoover and America in the Age of Lies. Master of Deceit challenges readers to explore Hoover and his secrets by offering dossiers of photos from his files, as well as FBI memoranda, movie posters, magazine covers, and cartoons from the era. Written by Marc Aronson. Narrated by Luke Daniels. Was Hoover a protector of America or a betrayer of its principles? What is the price of security? Here is a book about the twentieth century that blazes with questions and insights about our choices in the twenty-first. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Aronson’s upcoming book, Master of Deceit: J. Edgar Hoover and . Edgar Hoover and America in the Age of Lies is scheduled to release in early 2012. Aronson says FDR. About the author: Marc Aronson has a doctorate in American history and is a member of the graduate faculty in the library school at Rutgers.

Marc Aronson has a doctorate in American history and is a member of the graduate faculty in the library school at Rutgers. Marc Aronson lives in New Jersey.

Aronson uses Hoover and his work at the FBI as a lens to view America from the 1920s-1960s and the themes he develops can clearly be used to view post 9/11 America.

Special attention is given to Hoover's creation and directing of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), as well as his impact on the future of the United States. Aronson uses Hoover and his work at the FBI as a lens to view America from the 1920s-1960s and the themes he develops can clearly be used to view post 9/11 America. The country's history and the decisions those in power have made are complex and can be interpreted in a variety of ways.

In 1917, just as Reed was in Russia basking in the glories of the revolution, a young lawyer named John Edgar Hoover was beginning to burrow his way into the heart of the American government, in Washington, DC.

And the man behind it all was J. Edgar Hoover, the FBI's first director. In this unsparing exploration of one of the most powerful Americans of the twentieth century, accomplished historian Marc Aronson unmasks the man behind the Bureau- his tangled family history and personal relationships; his own need for secrecy, deceit, and control; and the broad trends in American society that shaped his world. Hoover may have given America the security it wanted, but the secrets he knew gave him - and the Bureau - all the power he wanted.

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Love Song of J. Edgar Hoover. Love Song of J. Official and Confidential: the Secret Life of J Edgar Hoover.

“King, there is only one thing left for you to do....Take it before your filthy, abnormal, fraudulent self is bared to the nation.”


Dr. Martin Luther King received this demand in an anonymous letter in 1964. He believed that the letter was telling him to commit suicide.


Who wrote this anonymous letter? Most likely William Sullivan, an assistant director of the FBI.


Who was Sullivan trying to impress in his campaign against King? J. Edgar Hoover.


In this unsparing exploration of one of the most powerful Americans of the twentieth century, accomplished historian Marc Aronson unmasks the man behind the Bureau—his tangled family history and personal relationships; his own need for secrecy, deceit, and control; and the broad trends in American society that shaped his world. Hoover may have given America the security it wanted, but the secrets he knew gave him—and the Bureau—all the power he wanted. Master of Deceit challenges readers to explore Hoover and his secrets by offering dossiers of photos from his files, as well as FBI memoranda, movie posters, magazine covers, and cartoons from the era. Was Hoover a protector of America or a betrayer of its principles? What is the price of security? Here is a book about the twentieth century that blazes with questions and insights about our choices in the twenty-first.


Hi_Jacker
"Master of Deceit" is well written & organized. He provides a laconic overview of his childhood, early family life & education. The main thrust of the book is Hoover's career & how it evolved. His government service begins in WWI & does not end until his death in the early seventies. Although I was familiar with some of the history, the book is rich in detail & analysis. Aronson dispels the myths that prevailed during Hoover's life as well as those that surfaced after his death. J. Edgar Hoover was the first director of the FBI & carefully choreographed its image as this well organized & efficient crime fighting organization that was protecting America. This image was tarnished by the FBI's sloppy investigation it conducted for the Warren Commission that was charged with investigating the assassination of President Kennedy. The FBI's reputation continued to decline as revelations of Hoover's support of McCarthyism, his secret files & programs such as Cointelpro became known to the public.
The book reveals a disturbing pattern of lies, deceit & manipulation of the truth to protect himself & promote the image of the FBI in his quest to maintain power. The Constitution & the bill of rights lay in shambles by the time of his death. The only criticism I had for the book is the author avoided a full description of Hoover's role in the investigation of the Kennedy assassination & his true beliefs on what happened. Otherwise, I thoroughly enjoyed this book.
Anasius
This book was in excellent condition. It was very informative and I learned much about J. Edgar Hoover that I never knew before. My book club will be discussing it at the end of this month.
Folsa
Didn't care for the book!
Tinavio
Unfortunately our most publicized former FBI Chief was more of a publicity-seeker than a law enforcement executive. Hoover was mainly interested in promoting himself, often at the expense of others, and in so doing he hurt many people, including Melvin Purvis, one of his best agents.
Halloween
Aronson’s portrait of J. Edgar Hoover during his 40 year reign as the head of the FBI was riveting and to quote the author, “scary.” I didn’t really know much about Hoover and I was sickened by his tactics. Hoover blackmailed “everyone” by keeping secret files; he poisoned his staff with his directives and took advantage of his position whenever he felt the inclination. There was meticulous period research but this did not read like a history book but a superb thriller you can’t put down. This period in US history was certainly tainted with the likes of J. Edgar Hoover and Joseph MacCarthy. As I rooted for those “few” who took on J. Edgar Hoover with right and might; I cried for the many like the Rosenbergs, the Scottsboro Boys and Martin Luther King. Illustrated and Includes bibliographical references (p. 198-219) and index. Highly recommended for high school students.
Micelhorav
In his effort to put the story of J. Edgar Hoover and his FBI into historical context and to address multiple points-of-view about Hoover's legacy, author Marc Aronson has included some truly half-baked political and personal theories about Hoover that have been neither thoroughly documented nor substantiated by sufficient additional research on his part. That's why I found "Master of Deceit" thin, shallow, and more of a political polemic than a scholarly work.

And it's truly scary that this is being represented as a book for high school students, because it's primarily point-of-view writing rather than incisive historical research and reporting. Aronson himself even seems prematurely defensive about what he's written, including a lengthy addendum to the book ("How I Researched and Wrote this Book") that all but admits his biases ("… I live in a world of liberals and leftists, in which there is tacit agreement to see Senator Joseph McCarthy and J. Edgar Hoover as terrible men and to speak passionately about the victims of their witch hunts.") The five commenters included in the "advance praise" flyleaf of this book are all presented as simply unattached names (with no affiliations to establish their credibility to praise and critique this book).

I fear that in the zealous effort to decry the excesses of J. Edgar Hoover's FBI and its smearing of political and social opponents, "Master of Deceit" engages in a form of smear tactics itself by engaging in much historical revisionism and tenuous linkages to other social forces at work in America in that era. While this book may prove interesting popular reading for those who wish to engage in political "parlor games," such as speculation on Hoover's race and sexuality, it isn't scholarship and it certainly doesn't teach high schoolers to exercise critical thinking in their research. This could have been a popular and high-readable book if only the author had parked his point-of-view and followed the facts, rather than trying to score political points.
Thordibandis
Here's the thing: Aronson cannot help but insert his far leftist liberalism into almost every page. If you seek objectivity, you'll have to look elsewhere.
Master of Deceit: J. Edgar Hoover and America in the Age of Lies ebook
Author:
Luke Daniels,Marc Aronson
Category:
Education & Reference
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1425 kb
FB2 size:
1445 kb
DJVU size:
1563 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Candlewick on Brilliance Audio; Library edition (April 24, 2012)
Rating:
4.9
Other formats:
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