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Thumped (Bumped) ebook

by Megan McCafferty


Praise for BUMPED: Megan McCafferty has conceived a hilarious, touching, truly original novel, told in her . She always envisioned two books, Bumped and Thumped, and the story is over. Even so, she leaves us with a topic worth of thought and discussion. Let's not disappoint her, shall we?

Praise for BUMPED: Megan McCafferty has conceived a hilarious, touching, truly original novel, told in her trademark, spot-on voice. Readers of every age will delight in this new arrival. Rachel Cohn, bestselling author of NICK & NORAH'S INFINITE PLAYLIST). Let's not disappoint her, shall we?

For everyone who helped me celebrate the Summer of Yes. Contents.

For Caitlyn, Carly, Cailey, and Zoë-. when you’re old enough. She’s new, so I’ve got seniority, but she’s flaunting a twenty-four-week bump that is just too perfect and adorable not to vote for. Her family put her in private school when the public districts starting making all preggers drop out of regular high school to attend a special school where they’re all brainwashed into keeping their deliveries.

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Megan McCafferty has written professionally about adolescence for two decades. The author of ten novels, she is best known for Sloppy Firsts and four more books in the New York Times-bestselling Jessica Darling series for teens

Megan McCafferty has written professionally about adolescence for two decades. The author of ten novels, she is best known for Sloppy Firsts and four more books in the New York Times-bestselling Jessica Darling series for teens. She has two new novels coming out in 2020: TRUE TO YOUR SELFIE (Scholastic, 2/20) and THE MALL (Wednesday Books, 7/20). McCafferty looks at teen travails with humor as well as heart.

Disclaimer: I love Megan McCafferty's books. You have been warned.

When a virus makes everyone over the age of eighteen infertile, would-be. The ending is truncated in favor, I understand it, of a sequel titled Thumped, which I may end up reading just to see what happens to a set of people left rather in midair at the end of this volume. Disclaimer: I love Megan McCafferty's books.

Megan McCafferty’s Bumped series of books are must-read teen dystopian fiction, along with Ally Condie’s Matched series and Veronica Roth’s Divergent trilogy. Thumped, the sequel to Bumped, manages to be satiric, scary, and romantic at the same time

Megan McCafferty’s Bumped series of books are must-read teen dystopian fiction, along with Ally Condie’s Matched series and Veronica Roth’s Divergent trilogy. Thumped, the sequel to Bumped, manages to be satiric, scary, and romantic at the same time. It continues the story of separated-at-birth twins, Melody and Harmony, girls as engaging as McCafferty’s Jessica Darling. These sisters are the most popular teen girls on the planet. To their fans, they seem to be living ideal lives. Harmony is married to Ram and living in Goodside, the religious community that once meant everything to her.

This time the screeching isn’t coming from the kettle. It’s me. Jondoe flails around from his spot on the floor next to the bed. WHAT DID I TELL YOU? NO ALARMS! EVER!. I ask, taking a breath in between each word. Jondoe turns and stares at me like he’s startled to be here. Oh, Harmony, I’m sorry, Jondoe says. I thought you were Moxie. My personal assistant. He groans, then vigorously rubs the sleep out of his eyes. I thought she set an alarm.

Электронная книга "Thumped", Megan McCafferty Megan McCafferty’s Bumped series of books are must-read teen dystopian fiction, along with Ally Condie’s Matched series and Veronica Roth’s Divergent trilogy

Электронная книга "Thumped", Megan McCafferty. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Thumped" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Megan McCafferty’s Bumped series of books are must-read teen dystopian fiction, along with Ally Condie’s Matched series and Veronica Roth’s Divergent trilogy.

Megan McCafferty’s Bumped series of books are must-read teen dystopian fiction, along with Ally Condie’s Matched series and Veronica Roth’s Divergent trilogy. Thumped, the sequel to Bumped, manages to be satiric, scary, and romantic at the same time. It continues the story of separated-at-birth twins, Melody and Harmony, girls as engaging as McCafferty’s Jessica Darling. These sisters are the most popular teen girls on the planet. To their fans, they seem to be living ideal lives. Harmony is married to Ram and living in Goodside, the religious community that once meant everything to her. Melody has the genetically flawless Jondoe as her coupling partner, which means money and status—and a bright future. But both girls are hiding secrets. And they are each pining for the only guys they can’t have…. The biggest risk of all could be to finally tell the truth.

Qudanilyr
I forgot how much I liked the story of Melody and Harmony. This is a world that I can’t fathom. The plot is interesting.

Thumped is much more fast-paced than Bumped was. The events take place over a couple of days. I was shocked at the way Harmony’s community treated her. But that’s how things go when you fear things that do not conform to your ideals/thoughts. Melody is the one that I think grows the most in this story. She struggles with what the right and wrong thing to do is. Guilt eats at her, and she doesn’t know how to deal with it.

I like the direction the book went. The characters want to make a change with how things are done. They don’t want teenagers to feel like they have to get pregnant. The morality of exploiting young people is a big presence in this book. I think the author did a great job of portraying this. The only thing that I don’t think was hashed out well is the ending. Things just kind of leave off, and we don’t know if things change, or stay the same.

Overall, Thumped is an interesting read, and speaks to the sociologist in me.
Ahieones
Thumped picks up several months after Bumped left off--twins Harmony and Melody are once again separated but both are struggling with their life choices in a society where only teenaged girls can become pregnant. Harmony has returned to Goodside to attempt to fit in with "husband" Ram, even though she's now pregnant with twins after her one night stand with professional stud, Jondoe, and to say it's not going well is an understatement. Confused about what she wants in life, Harmony's still longing for the beautiful Jondoe, even though she's making a valiant attempt to be a faithful member of her religion. Meanwhile, Melody is "pregnant" as well...or is she? It's not really a spoiler to say that Melody, Zen, and Jondoe are playing out the biggest scam on the world to date to raise awareness of how young girls are being exploited into making babies before they are mentally ready to do so.

The action is fast and gripping with short chapters that make the book fly by. Told in the alternating viewpoints of Melody and Harmony, we see the twins rebel against a system that uses young girls' bodies as baby making factories. There are romances and deep family bonds as well as revealed secrets as the story unfolds; I especially like how the book ends because it seems like a realistic way to bring the story to a close. The absence of any adult with common sense takes away a level of believabiltiy, but overall this book is just as engaging and fun as the first. Definitely an enjoyable read!
Zicelik
Oh, Megan McCafferty. How dare you end this two-book series now? I demand that you write a third. Chumped? Dumped? Humped?

Thumped picks up eight and a half months after Bumped ended. Harmony has returned to Goodside, the religious compound that she called home prior to decamping to Otherside to find her identical twin sister, Melody. Harmony didn't leave alone, however; she is pregnant with twin girls. Meanwhile, back in Otherside, Melody, thanks to ALTERR (Artificial Living Tissue Engineered for Reproducing Reproduction), is "mocked up." ALTERR is a fake womb that simulates pregnancy so realistically that it fools even doctors. Babies show up on an ultrasound, even though Melody isn't pregnant. But she's pretending to be, and helping her out is Jondoe, the true Baby Daddy of Harmony's twins and the faux Baby Daddy of Melody's.

With me so far? It really isn't as confusing as it sounds.

Also along is Zen, Melody's soulmate, who wants to wage war against in what he calls The Mission: "protesting against the culture of reproductive profiteering." Zen, for all of his zealotry, is a likable boy, and Melody struggles with the intensity of her feelings for him. They are both virgins, in Melody's case not for a lack of trying and heavy marketing of her womb, and Zen more due to a dogged determination that his sperm not be used against him.

The message of Thumped echoes that of Bumped. We are in danger of living in a world where teen pregnancy, which already elevates some girls to celebrity status, will consume us to the point that we, like Melody's parents, Ash and Ty, are willing to whore out our children to procreate. As Melody observes, "Our whole world has gone ... baby crazy. ... That's what we're dealing with here. Not bumps or pregs or deliveries. Or whatever other euphemism you want to use to distance yourself from the truth. We're making babies. We're creating people. And we're having meaningless sex to do it! And yet we pretend like it's no big deal. We pretend we aren't in the business of buying and selling human beings."

Part of Melody's enlightenment as to the terrible nature of "pregging" is due to the Jaydens, the couple paying for the twins she supposedly is carrying. Melody is drawn to them. Her gut instinct is that they would make great parents, and she truly would like to help them out in that regard. But Melody is not the one who is pregnant, and Harmony is back with her husband, Ram, in Goodside.

This is a fantastic satire of what we have become and the potential of what we could be, if we continue to prize celebrity over actual accomplishment. Parts of this are guffawingly funny, and parts might meld your cold hard heart just a little. When Ram makes a life changing announcement, I admit that I didn't know whether to applaud him or laugh at the silliness of the reactions he received. Again, we buy into a celebrity culture based on nothing but toothpicks in the sand.

My biggest complaint about Thumped is its ease. What made Bumped so intriguing is that it asked us to examine that side of us that buys People magazine and reads articles about Jamie Lynn Spears' teen pregnancy (color me guilty) or watches reality television about teen mothers. As a high school teacher, I see so many girls get pregnant during the very years they should be free from that enormous responsibility, so Bumped gave me a lot to think about and consider. Thumped is not as challenging. The "bad guys" are much easier to spot, and the debate is more clear cut. There isn't a lot of controversy or conflict here as far as the book's message. Oh, sure, Melody and Harmony find themselves in a pickle, and the men in their lives alternately assist and provoke them, but there is no mystery as to what Megan McCafferty wants us to take away from her novel. I think I miss that.

Still, though, Thumped is a good follow-up to its predecessor. Melody and Harmony's voices are strong. We can see the confused teenaged girls in them. What is the right thing to do? What do we owe our parents? What do we owe God? And what do we owe ourselves? Melody confronts this with poignancy. She knows she's too young to be a mother, but this is her last chance before the virus renders her infertile.

And that is why I want a third book. Part of me would like the romance of a happy ending. There is a cure! Melody can have a baby when she's older! The Jaydens can have a baby! Harmony can have a baby! Teenage girls can go back to being teenage girls! Teenage boys no longer have to compete against each other for Most Desirable Sperm!

But McCafferty has said that this is it. She always envisioned two books, Bumped and Thumped, and the story is over. Even so, she leaves us with a topic worth of thought and discussion. Let's not disappoint her, shall we?
Wenaiand
I loved Thumped!
I was reluctant to read it. I didn't like Bumped, not one bit. I even threw it across the room when I finished the last page (yes, I put myself in time-out after that).

After reading Thumped, I see that I just didn't get Bumped. I read it at a point of my life that wasn't the best time to read a book about kids and babies and infertility and all that. I get that now. Let's just call it bad timing on my part.

This week I read Thumped and really appreciated it. I laughed and cried in all the right places. I got the clever use of language and appreciated how Megan McCafferty created this super believable, yet terrifyingly realistic, world in the not too distant future where all of this could totally happen. I loved all the language and creative names of everything. So clever! She also expertly crafted a fun read that calls attention to serious issues. That is no easy task. I won't get political or talk religion, but I do appreciate her attention to both and the way Bumped & Thumped will get some people thinking about things in a way they may not have before. To accomplish that in a way that is both nonthreatening & entertaining is super impressive! I also loved the familiar references to Princeton, NJ (very close to where I grew up). So fun!

I don't think I need to re-read Bumped, but I do have a new appreciation and respect for both books now!
I give them both 5 Blings!
Thumped (Bumped) ebook
Author:
Megan McCafferty
Category:
Literature & Fiction
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1426 kb
FB2 size:
1222 kb
DJVU size:
1260 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Balzer + Bray (April 24, 2012)
Pages:
304 pages
Rating:
4.7
Other formats:
lrf azw mbr docx
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