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The High Girders (U) ebook

by John Prebble


Culloden was the first book and it chronicles the defeat of the clans in one pivotal battle.

John Edward Curtis Prebble, FRSL, OBE,(23 June 1915 – 30 January 2001) was an English journalist, novelist, documentarian and popular historian. He is best known for his studies of Scottish history. One of his first big successes was The High Girders (1956), a description of the Tay Bridge Disaster, involving the collapse of the first Tay rail bridge to Dundee. It has remained a popular work ever since publication. Culloden was the first book and it chronicles the defeat of the clans in one pivotal battle. The two other works were The Highland Clearances (1963) and Glencoe (1966).

The High Girders book. His parents emigrated there after World War I. Returning to England with his family, he attended the Laty John Edward Curtis Prebble, FRSL, OBE was an English/Canadian journalist, novelist, documentarian and historian. He was born in Edmonton, Middlesex, England, but he grew up in Saskatchewan, Canada, where his father had a brother. Returning to England with his family, he attended the Latymer School.

ISBN13:8601415772760.

The High Girders by John Prebble. Year Published: 1959. Colour illustrative paper cover. Pages and binding are presentable with no major defects. Paper cover has mild edge wear with visible rubbing and creasing.

High girders: tay bridge disaster, 1879'. Prebble's 1968 volume chronicles Scotland's failed 1695 attempt to establish a colony in Central America in an effort to break free from Britain and become an empire

High girders: tay bridge disaster, 1879'. Prebble's 1968 volume chronicles Scotland's failed 1695 attempt to establish a colony in Central America in an effort to break free from Britain and become an empire. Everything that could go wrong did, and the plan ended in disaster, costing the lives of several thousand Scots as well as nearly half the country's wealth which wasn't much to begin with. Other new Scottish history titles from Dufour include Hugh Peebles's Warshipbuilding on the Clyde (ISBN 0-85976-530-X), John Riddell's The Clyde: The Making of a River (ISBN 0-85976-526-1), and George Seton's.

I illustrated it in fourth year at art college in Dundee!pic. 0 ответов 0 ретвитов 0 отметок Нравится.

The high girders by john prebble ( small pb book).

The High Girders - John Prebble. On the night of Sunday, December 28th 1897, in a high gale, the central span on the bridge over the estuary of the River Tay collapsed, taking with it an engine, six coaches and seventy-five passengers.

Personal Name: Prebble, John, 1915-. Publication, Distribution, et. Harmondsworth (C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

It was a bloody incident which had deep repercussions and was the beginning of the destruction of the Highlanders. John Prebble�s masterly description of the terrible events at Glencoe was praised as �Evocative and powerful� in the Sunday Telegraph.

On the night of Sunday, December 28th 1897, in a high gale, the central span on the bridge over the estuary of the River Tay collapsed, taking with it an engine, six coaches and seventy-five passengers.
Gindian
Very good history and explanation of the Tay Bridge collapse in 1879. A very easy read.
JoJoshura
I found this book years ago in the Bermuda library, it is very much worth a read, from many standpoints.

Aside from the story of the event itself and the aftermath, which as the first reviewer points out are indeed riveting, the Author does himself great credit in his investigations of the mechanisms of the failure from an engineering standpoint in the months after the event and during the trial of Sir Thomas Bouche.

Particularly striking are the admissions of Bouche to have not given more than a fleeting consideration of wind loading on the bridge, and specifically the "High Girders" the central span of the bridge which he was forced (from a shipping clearance standpoint) to elevate so the iron work sat on top of the iron piers with the train running inside. Noted by passengers after the bridge opened for ominous rumblings and vibrations, this section completely disappears on the fateful night with the train within.

Many papers and studies as to the exact cause of failure now exist using more modern techniques of stress analysis, the conclusion at the time of trial and pretty much of this book is that the wind load combined with the inadequate attachment of the vertical iron columns to the brick river piers caused the failure. Bouche argued to the end that the train derailed and caused it, which for me was always a little thin as the design should really have been able to withstand that one supposes.

Most stunning of all are the revelations of sheer incompetence at the casting foundry used to make much of the iron work in terms of quality control, and the practices used there for hiding defects (the title of this review), the amount of columns that were poured so very badly that even they were broken up for re-melting, the inappropriate selection of consultants (masonry experts working on iron work) and the lack of knowledge of calculus of Bouche himself (the calculations that were done were by an apprentice of sorts). Bouch himself is depicted as behaving very much as a gentleman to the end, even when he is "thrown under the bus" by his engineering peers (some very famous Victorian engineers), of whom only one admits that Bouche's lack of mathematical prowess and his neglect of wind loading or his "assumption of a nominal value" were extremely common.

The book features a picture of Bouche's early design for the Forth bridge on which he was working at the time of the Tay disaster, and it's pretty much an image of the one eventually built, and attributed elsewhere after he was removed from the project.

If you make the train journey across the Tay, and look from the east side of the train going Northwards, you can see the brick piers of the original bridge as they curve out from the shore under the side of the present bridge.

I forced Wobbly Dave to read this book, and I saw him last year after 10 years and he remembered it pretty well too for what that is worth.
anneli
It would be hard to write an account of the Tay bridge disaster of 1879 that isn't gripping. Prebble does at least an adequate job of presenting the details and I found his book hard to put down. He opens with the doomed train and the 75 people on board about to cross the two mile bridge at Dundee, Scotland on an evening late in December with a gale force wind coming down the Tay. The carriages crawl past the signal cabin... passengers looking out, one of them a child... strange flashes from the train on the bridge... two men from the signal cabin come out to investigate and in the moonlight see that all the high girders are gone, fallen with the train into the river. Prebble then backs up to tell the story of the building of the bridge, the longest in the world at the time. We get to know Thomas Bouch, the engineer in charge of its design. Queen Victoria travelled across his new creation on her way back from Balmoral in June 1879. She knighted Bouch shortly afterward.

It's haunting to read how fate played with some of the passengers. One woman had planned to take an earlier train but her coachman overslept. One man boarded a train for Perth instead of Dundee but corrected his mistake just in time. Two newlyweds were supposed to be on the train but were persuaded by friends to postpone their journey because of the terrible weather. Another man's friends tried to detain him at St. Andrews but he chose to walk several miles through the rain to catch the train. A grieving mother waiting for the body of her daughter to be recovered from the river got a telegram from the girl apologizing for staying in Edinburgh instead of coming home when she was supposed to. For some, the tragedy was compounded. Two men travelling separately were returning from burying their fathers. One fellow was returning from comforting his mother; his sister had been buried the previous week.

Blame for the disaster was laid almost completely on Bouch. Thoroughly disgraced, he died 10 months later from a cold, aged 58. One wonders how much the terrible strain had compromised his immune system.

A map would have been helpful to locate the places mentioned.
The High Girders (U) ebook
Author:
John Prebble
Category:
Engineering
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1965 kb
FB2 size:
1440 kb
DJVU size:
1180 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Ulverscroft; Large Print edition edition (March 1, 1980)
Pages:
365 pages
Rating:
4.1
Other formats:
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