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Curiosity: How Science Became Interested in Everything ebook

by Philip Ball


Philip Ball is an immensely prolific science writer. Curiosity had a broader span of meaning in the 17th century than it usually has today.

Philip Ball is an immensely prolific science writer. On the one hand, there was the genuine desire to go where no person had gone before, but at the other extreme was the "cabinet of curiosities": collections of whimsical or grotesque creatures, minerals and manufactured artefacts. The journal of the Royal Society in its first years had as many reports of "strange creatures and events lately observed in foreign parts" as it did of what we now recognise as science.

I highly recommend Curiosity for anyone interested in science.

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A talk on my book of that title, delivered at the Perimeter Institute, Waterloo, Canada, December 2012. Белль и Себастьян (Фильм 2013) Приключения, Семейное кино - Продолжительность: 1:39:04 Watch Movies - библиотека фильмов Recommended for you.

Random House, May 17, 2012 - Science - 480 pages

Random House, May 17, 2012 - Science - 480 pages.

In the late sixteenth century this attitude began to change dramatically, and in Curiosity: How Science Became Interested in Everything, Philip Ball investigates how curiosity first became sanctioned-when it changed from a vice to a virtue and how it became permissible to ask any and every question about the world. Ball also asks what has become of curiosity today: how it functions in science, how it is spun and packaged for consumption, how well it is being sustained, and how the changing shape of science influences the kinds of questions it may continue to ask. Though proverbial wisdom tell us that it was through curiosity that our innocence was lost, that has not deterred us.

The book Curiosity by Philip Ball is certainly a stimulating romp through the beginnings of science in the early modern period, whatever else it is. The book is primarily about the development of science in the late sixteenth and the seventeenth centuries, but it is much more than that

The book Curiosity by Philip Ball is certainly a stimulating romp through the beginnings of science in the early modern period, whatever else it is. The book is primarily about the development of science in the late sixteenth and the seventeenth centuries, but it is much more than that. It is a book about the cultures of the time, and the rich interplay between the kind of thinking that ultimately led to modern science and the ways of thinking that took place in those days, which in many ways were decidedly different from what we might expect of "scientific me.

Curiosity: How Science Became Interested in Everything. How curoisity was behind the development of science. Beginning with vast collections of curios. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. In this book we see how the scientific revolution was really more of an evolution, and that many of the early practitioners of science in the 16th to 18th Centuries were not what we might consider today as scientifically minded, although they were quite innovative for their time. Clarity is not this particular book's strong point. It was interesting to read about the tussles with the various players and their theories.

With the recent landing of the Mars rover Curiosity, it seems safe to assume that the idea of being curious is alive and well in modern science—that it’s not merely encouraged but is seen as an essential component of the scientific mission. Yet there was a time when curiosity was condemned. Neither Pandora nor Eve could resist the dangerous allure of unanswered questions, and all knowledge wasn’t equal—for millennia it was believed that there were some things we should not try to know. In the late sixteenth century this attitude began to change dramatically, and in Curiosity: How Science Became Interested in Everything, Philip Ball investigates how curiosity first became sanctioned—when it changed from a vice to a virtue and how it became permissible to ask any and every question about the world. Looking closely at the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries, Ball vividly brings to life the age when modern science began, a time that spans the lives of Galileo and Isaac Newton. In this entertaining and illuminating account of the rise of science as we know it, Ball tells of scientists both legendary and lesser known, from Copernicus and Kepler to Robert Boyle, as well as the inventions and technologies that were inspired by curiosity itself, such as the telescope and the microscope. The so-called Scientific Revolution is often told as a story of great geniuses illuminating the world with flashes of inspiration. But Curiosity reveals a more complex story, in which the liberation—and subsequent taming—of curiosity was linked to magic, religion, literature, travel, trade, and empire. Ball also asks what has become of curiosity today: how it functions in science, how it is spun and packaged for consumption, how well it is being sustained, and how the changing shape of science influences the kinds of questions it may continue to ask. Though proverbial wisdom tell us that it was through curiosity that our innocence was lost, that has not deterred us. Instead, it has been completely the contrary: today we spend vast sums trying to reconstruct the first instants of creation in particle accelerators, out of a pure desire to know. Ball refuses to let us take this desire for granted, and this book is a perfect homage to such an inquisitive attitude.
Ziena
“Curiosity killed the cat,” goes the children’s ditty. And the implied warning that delving blindly into the unknown can be dangerous has been a common trope in the history of science. But unfortunately the most common form of the warning has come from the perspective of religion, saying certain aspects of the universe are “God’s domain” where man is not meant to trespass. Thus so often the scientific revelation of truth has been delayed by adherence to dogma.
And to this day, analyses like this one virtually give religion a free pass for having done so. Like some other sources, this book brushes off the persecution of Galileo as having not been for what he said, but because of the way he said it. Nonsense. It strikes me as like saying the Civil War was not over slavery, but over “states’ rights.” In both cases the reality, while complex, is what it is.
Curiosity is a natural impulse because it feeds our intelligence. All efforts to hold it in disdain have done us a disservice.
VAZGINO
History of science, well done, by an Oxford guy. Very learned. Really interesting on the slow transition from the middle ages view of nature to the modern idea of science. History of ideas.
Todal
This is a well written and interesting narrative history of science up to the early 19th century. All the big--and many lesser known but important--scientific names are here.
Hidden Winter
Using a historical perspective it gave new insights into the progress of science
Celore
I'm sure Phillip Ball is an erudite and exacting person; he certainly seems to think so as do the reviewers who dare comment on his books. I read his book "Universe of Stone" and was captivated by his appreciation and description of Chartres Cathedral - what it was, why it was, how and why it was built and how it marked a profound change in European architecture. PB located it among the many other wonders of cathedrals, great ang small.
But later I read his other books about Music, Branches, Colors, Shapes, etc.
I looked for a treatment like 'Universe'. Instead, I found dry 'writings' ; visions informed only by pure intellect, not art or human aspirations. He wrote many other of books regarding music, shapes, colors, patterns, etc.
But he did nothing to telll us what these subjects are about! Philip Ball, attempting to perfectly explain his subjects goes much too far.
Yes, he failed us. He failed himself.

PB is certainly invited to respond.
The Sinners from Mitar
This book was the reading for my book club, so I felt obligated to finish it. While I learned a great deal about various topics, including the scientific revolution and the history of the British Royal Society, it was a slog. To me, the scaffolding of "curiosity" simply wasn't sturdy enough to hold (up) my interest.
Wrathshaper
What is most surprising in this book is just how quickly you will float over the many centuries that this gem glides over and just how quickly you discover how the history of ideas is never as clear-cut as we'd like to believe. The final entreaty for us ti try and focus our energies on every subject that arouses our curiosity, rather than just a blind rush to identify everything in order to glean a grand truth is a wonderful message to scientist and non-scientist alike.
Arrived on time and as promised. Thank you!
Curiosity: How Science Became Interested in Everything ebook
Author:
Philip Ball
Category:
Engineering
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1558 kb
FB2 size:
1220 kb
DJVU size:
1409 kb
Language:
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press; Reprint edition (September 17, 2014)
Pages:
480 pages
Rating:
4.4
Other formats:
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