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A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction (Center for Environmental Structure Series) ebook

by Ingrid Fiksdahl-King,Shlomo Angel,Christopher Alexander


At the core of these books is the idea that people should design for themselves their own houses, streets, and communities. After a ten-year silence, Christopher Alexander and his colleagues at the Center for Environmental Structure are now publishing a major statement in the form of three books which will, in their words, "lay the basis for an entirely new approach to architecture, building and planning, which will we hope replace existing ideas and practices entirely.

Ingrid Fiksdahl-King. Mar 31, 2011 Matt rated it did not like it.

Decades after its publication, it is still one of the best-selling books on architecture.

alexander, Christopher"; Alexander, Christopher; Angel, Shlomo; Jacobson, Max; Ishikawa, Sara; Silverstein, Murray; Fiksdahl-King, Ingrid. ISBN 10: 0195019199 ISBN 13: 9780195019193

alexander, Christopher"; Alexander, Christopher; Angel, Shlomo; Jacobson, Max; Ishikawa, Sara; Silverstein, Murray; Fiksdahl-King, Ingrid. ISBN 10: 0195019199 ISBN 13: 9780195019193.

What others are saying.

It will enable a person to make a design for almost any kind of building, or any part of the built environment. After a ten-year silence, Christopher Alexander and his colleagues at the Center for Environmental Structure are now publishing a major statement in the form of three books which will, in their word. ONTINUE READING.

Top 10 most dangerous airports in the world 2019 - Продолжительность: 10:23 World Top ONE Recommended for you.

Alexander, Christopher; Ishikawa, Sara; Silverstein, Murray. Companion volume to The timeless way of building and The Oregon experiment. Symbolism in architecture, Semiotics. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

You can use this book to design a house for yourself with your family; you can use it to work with your neighbors to improve your town and neighborhood; you can use it to design an office, or a workshop, or a public building. And you can use it to guide you in the actual process of construction. After a ten-year silence, Christopher Alexander and his colleagues at the Center for Environmental Structure are now publishing a major statement in the form of three books which will, in their words, "lay the basis for an entirely new approach to architecture, building and planning, which will we hope replace existing ideas and practices entirely." The three books are The Timeless Way of Building, The Oregon Experiment, and this book, A Pattern Language. At the core of these books is the idea that people should design for themselves their own houses, streets, and communities. This idea may be radical (it implies a radical transformation of the architectural profession) but it comes simply from the observation that most of the wonderful places of the world were not made by architects but by the people. At the core of the books, too, is the point that in designing their environments people always rely on certain "languages," which, like the languages we speak, allow them to articulate and communicate an infinite variety of designs within a forma system which gives them coherence. This book provides a language of this kind. It will enable a person to make a design for almost any kind of building, or any part of the built environment. "Patterns," the units of this language, are answers to design problems (How high should a window sill be? How many stories should a building have? How much space in a neighborhood should be devoted to grass and trees?). More than 250 of the patterns in this pattern language are given: each consists of a problem statement, a discussion of the problem with an illustration, and a solution. As the authors say in their introduction, many of the patterns are archetypal, so deeply rooted in the nature of things that it seemly likely that they will be a part of human nature, and human action, as much in five hundred years as they are today.
OTANO
This book is insightful and fun to read. It is also a book that is easy to pick up and read a bit, and put it
down and come back later to pick up where you left off, because it is broken into many very short chapters,
each of which contain a key idea. It's hard to describe this book, because it is so unique in its approach
to telling the reader "how things ought to be" concerning everything from civil planning and city layout,
to floor-plans, to architectural design, to furnishing. The author is very opinionated and does not shy away
from boldly telling you what is wrong with the physical constructs of our urban, suburban, and rural areas,
and how all of that should be properly done in his imagined ideal world.

In some ways, this book is like reading the professional diary of your crazy uncle who is constantly ranting
about what's wrong with the world, and how he thinks it should be set right. However, after reading it for
a while, you get the impression that the author is not really crazy, so much as he is a brilliant eccentric
whose experience and understanding is based on an extremely broad appreciation of how human beings choose
to craft their surroundings, and how we get it right, and how we get it wrong, and why.

Be forewarned... you are not going to agree with everything the author says.
I don't agree, for example, with his outlandish claim that living in a home that is more than four stories
about the ground will eventually make you crazy, because I have loved living on the top floor of my
high-rise condo for the past ten years. I also don't agree with his idea that all kitchen cabinets should
be open shelves with no doors, because the doors just get in the way, hide what is contained therein,
and are essential useless. I must admit, however, that I love reading the author's insights on things
with which I disagree with him, and I have to admit that even on such issues... he's got good points!
Many times I find myself saying "Almost, thou persuadest me."

To be fair, I actually do agree with the author's views regarding the vast majority of his observations,
as they are all just good common-sense approaches, and I must admit they often leave me thinking
"Yes, that's such a beautifully simple truth... why don't we always build it that way, or do it that way?"

This book gives you the benefit of the sage wisdom of an author who is genuinely worth reading
and considering. Even though this book is decades-old, most of its observations are timeless.
It's so hard to classify the book. Is it a Western approach to Feng Shui ... without all the questionable
Eastern Spiritualism, and more of practical philosophy on how to best craft your environment?
Or is it better described as foundational reading for everyone from a City Planner, to an Architect,
to anyone building a house, to anyone one looking to make their home a more pleasant place?

However you choose to classify it... this book is a unique, delightful treatise on how things should
ideally be in order for human beings to be more comfortable, productive, and happy in their surroundings.
Micelhorav
Bought this as a gift for a friend. Since its original publication, I have purchased numerous copies as gifts and to have in multiple locations for reference. Written in a series of short 1-2 page chapters, the book goes through an array of critical "place making" criteria based on human behavior. As an architect/urban designer, it is one of my top 5 reference books when thinking through an new project. Although not a book intended to be read cover to cover, some of his other publications are written in a way to show how these "place making" elements can be combined to create a livable human habitat.
Akisame
Classic book from the 1970's written by a Berkley, CA and Oregon of University Professor. It is for serious architects or engineers who wish to be challenged by values in the way things are built. This man is the Archimedes of city planning. It is a dense read but will fire you up with dreams of a better way to plan humans enjoying each other, living together in balance with resources. It is over 1,000 valuable pages of hope for city planners or individual architects. It is a priceless AND timeless book, worthy to be preserved for 1,000's of years like Archimedes gifts to us. Also, see his more reader friendly "The Timeless Way of Building" only 550 pages long.
Ballagar
I like books that shake me up and make me think about new ideas or tip my ideas on their heads. This is that book. Made me think about things I had never thought about and relationships between ideas that changed my thinking totally. I am a teacher and I try to encourage my students to really think and stretch their minds. I want them to expand their minds and to find new and creative ways of interpreting information. I have not read all of this book but every time I dive in to the material, I am amused, challenged and my brain is tickled.
Kirizan
A must-read for anyone considering a remodel or busing a house or even re-landscaping. I am a huge fan if this book. It's broken up into individual concrete ideas, yet forms a holistic overview of why certain spaces work so well and others just feel unpleasant. It's not bogged down in opaque architectural theory, is always concise, and each "pattern" is a gem.
A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction (Center for Environmental Structure Series) ebook
Author:
Ingrid Fiksdahl-King,Shlomo Angel,Christopher Alexander
Category:
Engineering
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1950 kb
FB2 size:
1808 kb
DJVU size:
1240 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (1977)
Pages:
1171 pages
Rating:
4.5
Other formats:
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